community music – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png community music – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 Kelowna Community Music School looking for a new home after more than 30 years – Kelowna News https://giuliavalle.com/kelowna-community-music-school-looking-for-a-new-home-after-more-than-30-years-kelowna-news/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/kelowna-community-music-school-looking-for-a-new-home-after-more-than-30-years-kelowna-news/ [ad_1] Relocation of the music school Picture: Contributed The current Kelowna Community Music School at 728 DeHart Ave. The Kelowna Community Music School is ready to move. After more than 30 years in their current location on DeHart Avenue, they are looking for a new home. “It’s a house, so they did everything they could […]]]>

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Relocation of the music school

The Kelowna Community Music School is ready to move.

After more than 30 years in their current location on DeHart Avenue, they are looking for a new home.

“It’s a house, so they did everything they could to renovate and expand some rooms. But over the years, that conversation came up many times, and we just decided to bite the bullet,” says school superintendent Lucy Benwell.

She also said a lot of new construction had sprung up near their headquarters and the board felt it was time to act before their options became limited.

The music school sold the building in December and is renting it again. The deadline for finding new accommodation is July 2024.

The Kelowna Community Music School has just over 300 families enrolled, which equates to students taking over 500 lessons.

Benwell estimates they will need a facility twice the size of the 3,700 square feet the school currently occupies.

“We have created a wish list and we have a team looking at what we need. So we’re looking at either an existing building to remodel or land we can build on.

“Ideally, we’d want maybe 15 studios, including two or three large enough for group programming and maybe even performance space.”

Benwell says they plan to launch a fundraising campaign once they have a better idea of ​​how much money they need to raise. As a non-profit organization, KCMS relies heavily on financial support from grants, endowments, donors and sponsors.

If you would like to be part of the campaign, KCMS is looking for ambassadors to join the board.

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Community Music School Announces Spring Programs and New Principal https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-announces-spring-programs-and-new-principal/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 13:53:40 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-announces-spring-programs-and-new-principal/ [ad_1] Appalachian Community Orchestra the Community Music School (CMS) At Appalachian State University, another semester of exciting music programs at Boone and Hudson begins this spring under new Principal Lisl Doughton. Activities are available for a variety of ages and experience levels. Registrations are open now at music.appstate.edu/cms. Most programs begin the week of January […]]]>

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Appalachian Community Orchestra

the Community Music School (CMS) At Appalachian State University, another semester of exciting music programs at Boone and Hudson begins this spring under new Principal Lisl Doughton. Activities are available for a variety of ages and experience levels.

Registrations are open now at music.appstate.edu/cms. Most programs begin the week of January 31. CMS offers “Pay What You Can” options for group classes.

Programs in Boone – Youth and Adults

In community drum, Dr. Shawn Roberts will lead participants ages 4 and up in rhythms from around the world on drums from The Hayes School of Music. Families are invited to register together and make music

In the Appalachian Community Orchestra, from college musicians to professors play great orchestral music side by side. Will Selle and Taryn Wooten, band and orchestra directors at Watauga High School, conduct the orchestra, which is open to ages 12 through adults. Advanced musicians can also audition for the Appalachian Symphony Orchestradirected by Dr. Régulo Stabilito.

Community members have long been essential to the Appalachian Chorale, now led by Dr. Meg Stohlmann. No audition is required and any singer capable of playing their part in four-part harmony is welcome. The Appalachian Chorale will perform Will Todd’s “Mass in Blue,” an innovative jazz-style mass, and Zoom with the composer this spring.

Private lessons are now available in person at the Broyhill Music Center and online. App State students, faculty, and alumni are among the many private course instructors offering courses through CMS. Tuition assistance may be available for CMS courses.

Boone Programs – Youth

the Appalachian Youth Choir (AYC), CMS’s longest-running band program, invites students ages 7-14 to discover their voices in a community of singers led by Dr. Meg Stohlmann and supported by voice students from the Hayes School of Music. Watauga High School Choir Director (and Teacher of the Year) Brandon Winbush is the ensemble’s collaborating pianist. This spring, AYC will perform songs inspired by Star Wars, The Wizard of Oz, Disney and Dr. Seuss.

App Rocks! is a rock band program for ages 10-14 led by Dr. Katy Strand. Students learn to sing on a microphone, play electric guitar and bass, and play keyboard and drums, spending time on each instrument while learning and performing hit songs.

Let’s play the piano! offers two levels of class in the Piano Lab at Broyhill Music Center, led by Jenna Kyber and Julie Goforth. A fun and supportive environment develops students’ skills and enthusiasm for the piano.

Let’s play the ukulele! and Let’s play the guitar! are taught by Tanner McAteer, a graduate student in classical guitar performance. Students explore starting techniques on these versatile instruments and develop a musical avenue for self-expression.

Lisl Doughton becomes Head of Community Music School

Lisl Doughton

Lisl Kuutti Doughton became the new director of the Community Music School (CMS) at Appalachian State University in December 2021. Cellist and App State graduate, Doughton brings a lifelong love for music to her work as management of CMS.

“As part of the Hayes School of Music and the App State, CMS is uniquely positioned to make music education affordable for everyone while maintaining music as a profession,” says Doughton. “CMS employs twenty App State students, thirteen faculty and staff, and ten alumni in addition to excellent local teachers. We take a long-term view of the entire musician’s life cycle.

From 2019-2021, Doughton served as Program Manager for the Community Music School, managing enrollment and aspects of policies, advertising, budgets and payroll. During this time, under the leadership of Dr. Nicole Sonbert, CMS has grown into a vibrant music community offering private lessons and group programs for all ages.


About Community Music School

In conjunction with Appalachian State University’s Hayes School of Music, Community Music School (CMS) offers music lessons, ensembles, and private lessons for all ages and skill levels. CMS’s mission is to connect, create, engage and empower through music, fostering a vibrant community where diversity is valued and everyone is included in music creation. To increase access to music education for all, CMS offers Pay What You Can options for group programs and tuition assistance for private lessons. music.appstate.edu/cms

About Hayes School of Music

The Hayes School of Music prepares young musicians for professional life as performers, composers, music teachers, music therapists, conductors and music industry professionals, ensuring the next generation of musical leadership for the state, region and nation. Noted for the quality education provided by nationally and internationally recognized faculty musicians, the school offers four undergraduate degree programs and three graduate degree programs. Learn more about https://music.appstate.edu.

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Staff, volunteers, supporters and students of the new QC School of Music celebrate in the snow https://giuliavalle.com/staff-volunteers-supporters-and-students-of-the-new-qc-school-of-music-celebrate-in-the-snow/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 20:31:09 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/staff-volunteers-supporters-and-students-of-the-new-qc-school-of-music-celebrate-in-the-snow/ [ad_1] Ten-year dream for Hannah Holman finally came true on Friday morning as she helped cut the ribbon for the new Deanery School of Music. After carrying out $235,000 renovations to the historic two-story building at 1103 Main Street, Davenport, the new music school next to Trinity Episcopal Cathedral will open for classes on Monday, […]]]>

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Ten-year dream for Hannah Holman finally came true on Friday morning as she helped cut the ribbon for the new Deanery School of Music.

After carrying out $235,000 renovations to the historic two-story building at 1103 Main Street, Davenport, the new music school next to Trinity Episcopal Cathedral will open for classes on Monday, January 17.

“I’m so, so excited and happy to be here today,” said Holman, Founder and Artistic Director of Dean, Principal Cellist of the Quad City Symphony Orchestra and cellist for the New York City Ballet – said outside the front door on Friday. “This dream of finding an exquisite location for music education in the Quad Cities has come true.”

Hannah Holman, Principal Cellist of the QCSO and Cellist of the New York City Ballet Orchestra, at Friday’s grand opening (photo by Jonathan Turner).

The Deanery School of Music is a non-profit organization created to provide an inclusive home for high-quality music education, performance, and collaboration in the Quad Cities region. It seeks to enrich and improve the cultural and social fabric of the community through music and education.

Holman has been a member of the QCSO for 16 years and principal cello for 14 years. make this mutually beneficial,” she said on Friday.

She started researching buildings in 2012, but a year later she started performing in the New York City Ballet orchestra, so put the research on hold.

Holman first looked at the Dean (which was built in 1930 and had been vacant since 2009) in August 2018. After much research and discussion, she decided to move on.

The Deanery School of Music, 1103 Main St., Davenport, was originally built in 1930 and had been vacant since 2009.

“This building, which impressed me so much on that day in August, is for everyone,” she said on Friday. “This building is uplifting and inspiring. It allows people to dream, and I want everyone who walks through those doors to feel like they can dream and aspire to be anything they want to be.

“We have incredible faculty,” Holman said. “A lot of them have performed all over the world. They teach at big universities and they know this community.

They offer lessons in Suzuki Violin, Cello, Chamber Music, Alexander Technique, Music Literacy, and there will be master classes, lectures, and concerts. Eventually there will be a music technology program, jazz lessons and organ lessons. There is a need-based scholarship program that the Dean is working on, so everyone can afford to take classes.

“I really feel like a seamstress, sewing all the great things that are here together — and adding a centralized, beautiful location and maybe adding a touch of this and that,” Holman said.

Whether or not students become professional musicians, “training and exposure to music has been known to help in all fields and professions,” she said. “It’s for the Quad Cities. Feel free to come to us with what you would like to see offered and any suggestions.

Friday’s groundbreaking brought together Hilltop Campus Village Executive Director Molly Otting, Davenport Mayor Mike Matson, former Hilltop Principal Scott Tunnicliff, project donors, Trinity members, and staff and students. from school.

Reactions from others

Dean John Horn of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral is delighted to have the Dean’s School in the historic building, which is owned by the cathedral. Originally built as a residence for the Episcopal Bishop of Iowa, the diocese moved the bishop to Des Moines in 1945. Since then, the building has been occupied by the cathedral’s deans (or senior pastors) of the Trinity, until 2009.

Trinity Cathedral Dean John Horn speaks at Friday’s event (photo by Jonathan Turner)

“It continues Trinity Cathedral’s long, nearly two-century commitment to education, community and community service, and musical excellence,” Dean Horn said of music school.

Trinity was responsible for founding the former St. Katharine School (now Rivermont Collegiate) and St. Luke’s Hospital (now part of Genesis), he said.

One of Holman’s star cello students, Aviana Holst senior of North Scott, has spoken out in favor of the new school.

North Scott High senior Aviana Holst, who studies cello with Holman, speaks Friday at the deanery (photo by Jonathan Turner).

“I’ve been excited about this ever since Hannah told me it was a possibility, and I can’t believe this is finally happening,” she said. “I was a music student in the Quad Cities for 11 years, starting when I was a piano student at age 7.”

“What I missed was some sort of centralization that would make it easier for people to come together and make music,” Holst said. “There was no place where I could easily access high levels of education, like I could in Iowa City or Chicago.

“What I find so amazing about the deanery is that they are going to provide that for the students here, for the next generations of students who will come after me,” she said.

It’s also difficult to access classical music, especially by renting or buying instruments, Holst said. “It can prevent a lot of students from reaching their full potential. I know I wouldn’t be where I am today without the incredible generosity of so many of my teachers and others who loaned me instruments and everything you need to get to where you want to go. .”

The main hall of the Deanery School of Music, formerly used as a residence for the Episcopal Bishop of Iowa, and since 1945, the Deans of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, owner of the building (photo by Jonathan Turner).

“Scholarships are vitally important in helping people gain access to classical music, and they are voices we need for the future of music,” she added. “We need more diversity and people from all walks of life to embrace classical music in the future.”

“Even though it’s snowy and cloudy, for us it’s a clear, sunny day,” said Joseph Lohmuller, chairman of the deanery council. He had Holman perform several concerts at his home, along with other QCSO musicians.

Deanery School Board President Joseph Lohmuller speaks at Friday’s event (photo by Jonathan Turner).

“We have great aspirations for the future,” he said, noting that the Dean’s main financial supporters are the Hubbell-Waterman Foundation, Bechtel Trust, Moline Foundation, Scott County Regional Authority, Trinity Cathedral, Mark and Rita Bawden, Churchill Family Foundation and the Wagle Family.

“The Board is especially grateful to Steve Wiese, with Extensive Services, LLC, who completed the renovation of this outstanding facility and truly brought it back to life,” Lohmuller said. “He really shared the vision of how we can have a space to serve our students and the community.”

At one point there was talk of demolishing the building, he noted. Holman brings extensive expertise and “the highest level of education and skill” to the new school.

Wagle, the executive director, “has truly done an outstanding job and brings the credentials of his music degree from Brown University, and is also an accomplished singer and pianist,” Lohmuller said. “He’s also in a master’s program at the University of Iowa in music education – which fits perfectly with his role here with our school.”

school projects

Rishi Wagle said the Bechtel Trust provided a $50,000 grant for the project earlier this month and fundraising for schools began in late 2020.

Rishi Wagle, the school’s executive director and master’s student at the University of Iowa, speaks at Friday’s event, flanked by Hannah Holman, Dean John Horn, Ron May and Joseph Lohmuller (pictured by Jonathan Turner).

They hope to hold small concerts in the main hall, with a beautiful grand piano donated. The 1910s piano was donated by Ina Clegg of Chicago, who had no prior connection to QC but heard about the school through social media, Wagle said.

“I sort of took a bet on it, in a way,” he said, adding that he had never seen anyone before and it was only settled on Thursday. “Sounds good now.”

The grand piano offered in the deanery’s main concert hall (photo by Jonathan Turner).

One of the professors from the deanery (Ben Lorentzen from the QCSO) will lead a small student recital (viola and violin) on Saturday 22 January. Other local teachers include Scott Sund (cello) and Jenn Swift (piano), Wagle said.

The deanery does not charge its faculty to use the building for private lessons and recitals, he said. “We really want to make it an accessible space. We want it to become a centralized home for music education, and I think our faculty members, many of them, are excited about the opportunities for collaborations with other musicians, other teachers.

“This space and the resources we have now as a school, we are able to offer group classes,” Wagle said. “Many private teachers teach from home. It doesn’t give them the resources or the access to organize larger events. »

The restoration of the school library was sponsored by the Wagle family (photo by Jonathan Turner).

Holman said there will be some overlap with QCSO’s long-standing private tuition program, with instructors, but the Dean will supplement what is offered.

“Some students may hear the same thing, but say it in a different way,” she said. “I think I love that we have a location, and a beautiful location. And they’re starting to feel at home here and form new relationships.

Holman did not teach under the QCSO course curriculum, but some professors teach in both. You can find a full list of Deanery faculty, with biographies and course costs, on the school website.

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ASU Community Music School returns to in-person classes, announces new principal – Caldwell Journal https://giuliavalle.com/asu-community-music-school-returns-to-in-person-classes-announces-new-principal-caldwell-journal/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 13:55:47 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/asu-community-music-school-returns-to-in-person-classes-announces-new-principal-caldwell-journal/ [ad_1] Views of the publication: 58 BOONE, NC (January 10, 2022) – the Community Music School (CMS) at Appalachian State University is thrilled to announce the return of in-person private lessons in January 2022! Registration for all CMS programs will be open by January 10. Private lessons will be offered at the Broyhill Music Center […]]]>

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Views of the publication:
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BOONE, NC (January 10, 2022) – the Community Music School (CMS) at Appalachian State University is thrilled to announce the return of in-person private lessons in January 2022! Registration for all CMS programs will be open by January 10. Private lessons will be offered at the Broyhill Music Center and online. Group classes and ensembles will be returning to Broyhill Music Center in Boone and HUB Station Arts Center in Hudson.

Visit music.appstate.edu/cms to view spring classes and mark your calendars for our programs! In order to allow the whole community to make music together, CMS offers “Pay What You Can” options for group programs and CMS tutoring assistance. Follow us on Facebook or Instagram at @appcommunitymusic to see the latest news and be notified when registration opens.

Lisl Doughton becomes director of community music school

Lisl Kuutti Doughton will be the new principal of Appalachian State University Community Music School (CMS) from December 2021, leading CMS programs in Boone, Hudson and online. Cellist and App State graduate, Doughton applies a long-standing love for music to her CMS leadership work, which focuses on improving access to music education and activities for all.

From 2019 to 2021, Doughton served as the Program Manager for the Community Music School, managing enrollment and aspects of policy, advertising, budgets and payroll. During this time, under the leadership of Dr Nicole Sonbert, CMS has grown into a vibrant music community offering private lessons and group programs for all ages.

Doughton is also director of communications at the Hayes School of Music. She creates advertisements and graphics, helps with recruiting marketing, manages the website and social media, writes articles, edits and publishes “Keeping Time with the Hayes School of Music”, the electronic newsletter for HSOM.

In addition to his administrative work, Doughton teaches cello at Community Music School. She performs regularly for weddings and events in the High Country, Charlotte and Asheville areas. Doughton has performed as a soloist with orchestra and has given solo recitals in the United States and Japan (where she taught English in 2011-2012). She is also a professional artist, working primarily in the drawing media. Doughton received his MA in Cello Performance from Appalachian State University in 2019 and his BA in Music and Art from Furman University in 2011.

About the community music school

In conjunction with the Hayes School of Music at Appalachian State University, Community Music School (CMS) offers music lessons, ensembles, and private lessons for all ages and skill levels. CMS’s mission is to connect, create, engage and empower through music, fostering a vibrant community where diversity is valued and everyone is included in musical creation. To increase access to music education for all, CMS offers pay-per-view options for group programs and tuition assistance for private lessons. music.appstate.edu/cms

About the Hayes School of Music

The Hayes School of Music prepares young musicians for a professional life as performers, composers, music teachers, music therapists, conductors and music industry professionals, ensuring the next generation of musical leadership for the state. , region and nation. Noted for the quality of its teaching provided by nationally and internationally recognized music teachers, the school offers four undergraduate programs and three graduate programs. Learn more about music.appstate.edu.


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New Deanery School of Music to host a Ribbon Cutting Friday, open for classes January 17 https://giuliavalle.com/new-deanery-school-of-music-to-host-a-ribbon-cutting-friday-open-for-classes-january-17/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:04:47 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/new-deanery-school-of-music-to-host-a-ribbon-cutting-friday-open-for-classes-january-17/ [ad_1] After a one-year capital improvement project and two years of strategic planning, The deanery school of music will open classes on Monday, January 17, 2022. The Deanery School of Music is a non-profit organization established to provide an inclusive home for high-quality musical education, performance and collaboration in the Quad Cities region, according to […]]]>

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After a one-year capital improvement project and two years of strategic planning, The deanery school of music will open classes on Monday, January 17, 2022.

The Deanery School of Music is a non-profit organization established to provide an inclusive home for high-quality musical education, performance and collaboration in the Quad Cities region, according to a statement released Tuesday. The deanery seeks to enrich and improve the cultural and social fabric of the community through music and education.

The Doyenné was founded in 2019 by its artistic director, Hannah holman, who is the first cellist of the Quad City Symphony Orchestra and is a cellist for the New York City Ballet.

Pianist Michelle Alvarado and cellist Hannah Holman perform at the Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall in New York City on October 13, 2018.

“I am delighted to introduce the community to a school in the Quad Cities that has long been a dream of mine,” Holman said in the statement. “Quad Cities students deserve a safe, nurturing and inspiring space to thrive as individuals and musicians. With the help of so many, we have brought together passionate educators, ready to help everyone come together through music.

“We couldn’t be more excited to open our doors,” said The Deanery Executive Director Rishi Wagle. “So many people have worked over the past two years to turn Hannah’s vision into reality, and it’s wonderful to see it all come together.”

Rishi Wagle, Executive Director of the Deanery School of Music.

To celebrate the inauguration of this unique organization, the deanery will hold an inauguration ceremony on Friday January 14 at 11:30 am in collaboration with the Hilltop Campus Village. The ceremony will take place in the recently renovated deanery building in Episcopal Cathedral of the Trinity.

The school (the 5,500 square foot structure was previously the residence of the dean of the cathedral and had been vacant since 2009) is located at 1103 Main Street in Davenport. It will house the deanery’s programs, including private lessons, chamber music offerings and group music lessons.

The deanery building, built in 1930, was once the residence of the dean of the Episcopal Cathedral.

Molly Otting Carlson, Executive Director of the University village on top of a hill, is pleased that The Deanery is located in this historic district, because “engaging in music and education is essential to the human experience,” she said on Tuesday.

The $ 220,000 renovation of the deanery building would not have been possible without the contributions of several granting agencies, including the Hubbell-Waterman Foundation, the Moline Foundation, the Scott County Regional Authority and the Bechtel Trust, a- she noted. Neither would it have been possible without the support of its Board of Directors, Dean John Horn and the Episcopal Cathedral of the Trinity, and many philanthropists from the Quebec region.

Due to the continuing increase in COVID cases, all participants will be required to wear a face mask. The ceremony will take place outside. For more information on the Deanery School of Music, visit www.thedeanery.org or contact admin@thedeanery.org.

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David Surette, teacher at the community music school, “performed as he lived” – with an open ear and a lot of heart https://giuliavalle.com/david-surette-teacher-at-the-community-music-school-performed-as-he-lived-with-an-open-ear-and-a-lot-of-heart/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 22:03:54 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/david-surette-teacher-at-the-community-music-school-performed-as-he-lived-with-an-open-ear-and-a-lot-of-heart/ [ad_1] At a lunchtime concert in May 2019, folk guitar and mandolin teacher David Surette sat in a chair on one side of the stage at the Concord Community Music School and started playing a solo Irish jig on his mandolin, one foot tapping a solid rhythm on the ground. Some time later, South Asian […]]]>

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At a lunchtime concert in May 2019, folk guitar and mandolin teacher David Surette sat in a chair on one side of the stage at the Concord Community Music School and started playing a solo Irish jig on his mandolin, one foot tapping a solid rhythm on the ground.

Some time later, South Asian traditional music teacher Prem Sagar Khatiwada joined us, playing tabla drums. Then jazz teachers Matt Langley and Scott Kiefner added their sounds to the mix on the soprano saxophone and double bass. Finally, South Asian traditional music teacher Harimaya Adhikari began singing an improvised melodic line that recalled elements of both jazz and Hindu classical. The concert, titled “Common Ground: Searching for New Sounds,” focused on the similarities between musical styles, and it didn’t take long for the entire audience to clap to the beat of the mixed music.

Surette, a well-known performer and music teacher, died on December 18 at the age of 58, following a six-year battle with cancer. In his introduction to the Common Ground concert, broadcast on ConcordTV in April, Surette described it as an opportunity to connect with “tradition bearers,” people who help keep certain styles of music alive for the next generation. This month, faculty members at Concord Community Music School remember this concert as an example of Surette’s passion for perpetuating musical traditions and creating an inclusive music community in Concord and beyond. .

“He was truly an artist-teacher-scholar,” said Peggy Senter, recently retired founder and principal of Concord Community Music School. “His research skills and his writing were simply top notch scientifically, and everyone knows how amazing he was. And he was a master teacher; for any level of students he took it so seriously. It is, for me, a real model for any musician.

Susie Burke, wife and music partner of Surette, said Surette enjoys sharing her dedication to music with students at Concord Community Music School, which she believes was a big part of her musical identity.

“During the Mandolin Festival weekends that nearly took place on March 20, and the 20 annual holiday concerts we have hosted over the years, I had a window into his life at CCMS and I could feel the love and respect that everyone had for him. It was palpable. I have always felt so proud of my David, ”said Burke. “… When I or dear Peggy Senter would introduce and honor David at these events, this is the picture that repeats itself: Celebrated the audience more than him.” It was always about the music and the community, not him. ”

Surette’s colleagues at school remember him as a kind and patient teacher with a narrowed-eyed smile, always quick to offer words of encouragement and support.

“Hardly a day goes by as a teacher that I don’t ask myself, ‘What would David do?’ Said Liz Faiella, violin teacher, chair of the school’s folk, jazz and popular music departments. “A lot of times the students come in and they’re anxious or embarrassed, and David in his teaching and performing was always so aware of ‘Let’s enjoy this music’, like ‘Let’s watch the music and not ourselves. ‘”

Surette began teaching at the school in 1992 and traveled to Concord every Tuesday and Wednesday from her home in South Berwick, Maine. He was best known as a Celtic fingerstyle guitarist, as well as a skilled mandolin and bouzouki player, singer and songwriter. Surette had an extensive repertoire that covered folk music from a variety of traditions, including New England counter-dance tunes, traditional American music, blues, and ragtime. He has performed and recorded frequently with Susie Burke and with their daughters, Isa and Julianna Burke, in the family group Burke-Surette.

“David was my companion on all walks of this life,” said Burke. “He taught me and my daughters many lessons in music and life, and he will be missed forever.”

Despite his fame as a performer, his colleagues say he enjoyed collaborating with musicians of all levels and strived to create an inclusive environment on and off stage.

“No amount of talent was too small for him to want to play with the person,” said Audrey Budington, violin teacher at Concord Community Music School. “No one was too young, no one was too old. He was so encouraging and still very happy.

Music student John Blackford began taking guitar lessons at Concord Community Music School at the age of 75 in the early 2000s. Although he was nervous about playing and singing in public, Blackford, now 92, said Surette had helped him overcome this obstacle and that her accompaniment on the guitar during student recitals made him feel “like he’s in Nashville somewhere” .

Many young teachers at the music school, including Faiella, Budington, and violin teacher Jordan Tirrell-Wysocki, grew up listening to Surette’s music and viewed him as a mentor even as they became her colleagues.

“The world of music can be a really strange and difficult world to navigate, with many pitfalls and little guidance available for young people trying to figure out how to do it,” Tirrell-Wysocki said. “David was a really positive role model for (me as a) young man trying to figure out how he’s supposed to behave in this world. He set the bar very high, not just in terms of technical ability and musicality, but in terms of humility and respect, and just general kindness.

One of Tirrell-Wysocki’s favorite memories is filming a WMUR Musical clip with Surette having them play music on a frozen lake and climb to the top of a mountain with their instruments at dawn – he says Surette maintained her enthusiasm throughout every unusual adventure.

“He played the same way he lived, in a way,” said Faiella. “He played with this altruism, he always focused on the music but also on the other musicians, creating something beautiful together. What are the other musicians doing? How can I stand this? How can I add to this? How can I amplify this? And that’s also the way he interacted.

One of Surette’s most popular music school activities was hosting the annual March Mandolin Festival, a weekend of workshops and concerts featuring mandolin teachers and students from the whole world. Even after attending sessions all day, attendees stayed awake until the wee hours of the morning during jamming at the Grappone conference center.

Surette’s colleagues say he often reflected on his vision for the future of the school’s folk music department. Burke said that at home, Surette would often research or grade a piece of music a student expressed interest in, learning new things himself in the process. Senter has a stack of files from the early days of school, titled “Ideas from the Davids”, full of ideas from David Surette and former jazz department chair David Tonkin on how to improve and develop their respective programs.

“He was still thinking about the organization,” Senter said. “David has always thought, ‘How do we create a folk music draw for music school and a folk music identity that is also compatible with our classical music identity and our jazz music identity? “”

Even after being diagnosed with cancer in 2015, Burke said Surette worked as hard as she could to continue her classes. He continued to teach at Concord Community Music School until October 2021.

When the pandemic struck in March 2020, Surette developed a model of online distance music education that Senter described as a combination of lecture, concert and masterclass via video call, where students put themselves together. mute and play with the instructor. It became so popular that the Concord Community Music School welcomed students from as far away as Canada and Ireland.

“The way he handled his cancer diagnosis was just a model for me of how I would handle any trial in my life,” said Faiella. “He was incredibly positive, incredibly cheerful and continued to live his life to the fullest after this diagnosis.”

Concord musicians say their memories of Surette will remain at the forefront of their thoughts – and their jam sessions – in the future, as they continue to play the tunes they learned from him and pass them on to others. new students.

“I think it’s important that we keep talking about him,” Budington said. “I think it’s important that we continue to play his music and carry on his tradition, because he’s going to live that. ”

Local musicians have created a David Surette tribute Facebook page on Facebook.com/groups/tunesfordavidsurette.

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Launch of the International Public Register of Fine Instruments in 2022 https://giuliavalle.com/launch-of-the-international-public-register-of-fine-instruments-in-2022/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 22:55:07 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/launch-of-the-international-public-register-of-fine-instruments-in-2022/ [ad_1] The register will be an informative and educational resource for all collectors, investors, manufacturers, buyers, sellers, researchers, insurers and artistic institutions. Details on fine instruments are often difficult to find or lost in unknown sources. With this register, the problem of leaving members uncertain as to the value, history, authenticity and integrity of the […]]]>

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The register will be an informative and educational resource for all collectors, investors, manufacturers, buyers, sellers, researchers, insurers and artistic institutions.

Details on fine instruments are often difficult to find or lost in unknown sources. With this register, the problem of leaving members uncertain as to the value, history, authenticity and integrity of the instruments will no longer be questioned.

“Tragically, records for many quality instruments have been lost over many generations due to upheaval caused by epidemics, wars and natural disasters,” said Eva Lerner-Lam, Si-Yo Music Society Foundation, Inc. President and President. “Some were simply rejected by those who did not recognize their importance.

There will be a long process for those who wish to add to the registry. With the data collected, Si-Yo will store it on a cybersecure, independently managed and blockchain-ready system.

Having already accumulated information on several hundred string and bow instruments from museums and private collections, Si-Yo is testing its functionality with a multidisciplinary group of beta testers to prepare for the launch.

Si-Yo is also working with museums, such as the Museo del Violino in Cremona, Italy, to organize a backup archive for their databases.

Founded in 1966, the Si-Yo Music Society Foundation is based in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of New York. The organization seeks to bring classical music to a global community of music lovers.

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Queen Bee Music Association to Teach Instruments at Aspen Plaza Building | Business https://giuliavalle.com/queen-bee-music-association-to-teach-instruments-at-aspen-plaza-building-business/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 05:20:24 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/queen-bee-music-association-to-teach-instruments-at-aspen-plaza-building-business/ [ad_1] They created the Queen Bee Music Association a long, long time ago, in 2019. The husband-and-wife team Lindsay Taylor and Brian Nelson started their school to teach people how to play the ukulele, guitar and violin in two rented classrooms at the Desert Academy. Then the pandemic arrived. Queen Bee switched to virtual and […]]]>

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They created the Queen Bee Music Association a long, long time ago, in 2019.

The husband-and-wife team Lindsay Taylor and Brian Nelson started their school to teach people how to play the ukulele, guitar and violin in two rented classrooms at the Desert Academy.

Then the pandemic arrived. Queen Bee switched to virtual and private lessons until June of this year. By then, the Desert Academy had closed.

Taylor and Nelson launched weekly carols for kids ages 5 and under every Wednesday at Railyard Park in June and added children’s carols to the Southside Branch Library in September. In addition, there was a four week summer camp in July and August at Desert Montessori School.

But the Queen Bee Music Association needed a home of its own.

“We’ve been looking for a space since returning to face-to-face classes in June,” said Taylor, Executive Director. “It was difficult to find room for a group of people. “

Phase One Realty acquired in October the Aspen Plaza building and the neighboring Plaza de Comercio on Pacheco Street. Aspen Plaza, 1596 Pacheco, is a two-story office building with a few government offices, 40% vacant, and a vacant basement.

Phase One and Queen Bee have reunited.

“They’re a really good bunch,” Phase One associate broker Aaron Romero said of the Queen Bee couple. “They needed a place to land and we had a place for them to land. We want to renovate the building.

“We’re part of the facelift,” said Nelson, artistic director of Queen Bee.

Queen Bee leased the 1,440 square foot basement.

“We took some instruments over there – drums, guitars, ‘boom whackers’ – to do a sound test to make sure no sound was bleeding upstairs,” Taylor said.

Classes start on January 3 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays for children aged 5 to 16 and for adults from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Queen Bee has three classrooms.

Taylor and Nelson begin with four teachers and 10 week sessions with ukulele, guitar and percussion lessons. The cost is $ 20 per class and registration is via queenbeemusicassociation.org.

“At the end of [next] year we want to add banjo and mandolin teachers, ”Taylor said.

They are also planning to have an adult folk ensemble.

“Anyone who plays any instrument can come,” Taylor said.

Queen Bee raises $ 5,000 for paint, furniture and educational supplies.

Taylor’s day job is director of communications for the recently revived Creative Santa Fe, and she plays the flute, mandolin, violin, and ukulele. Nelson is a “drummer by trade” but also plays guitar and piano and does music production. He teaches music in public schools and manages audio at the Lensic Performing Arts Center.

“For our children, above all, we try to make music a positive experience,” said Nelson. “We are going at a slow pace. We try to have fun as a group. Our goal is not to stifle virtuosos. Rather, it’s about planting a seed for the love of music and the joy of music.

They got Queen Bee from the song by singer Taj Mahal that Nelson serenaded Taylor with while courting. They call it Queen Bee Music Association because “we didn’t just want to be seen as a school,” Taylor said.

“We want to build community through music,” Taylor said. “Music has the ability to connect people in ways that very few art forms can. There is a connection that occurs when you play music with other people.

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Detroit community music school appoints new principal: Detroit native Kristopher Johnson https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-community-music-school-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:26:42 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-community-music-school-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ [ad_1] When the director of jazz studies at the College of Music Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroit, or CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring board were looking for someone who knows the Detroit community well. Kristopher johnson – from Detroit, Michigan State University […]]]>

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When the director of jazz studies at the College of Music Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroit, or CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring board were looking for someone who knows the Detroit community well.

Kristopher johnson – from Detroit, Michigan State University alumnus, Grammy-nominated educator and songwriter, arranger and trumpeter – is the person they were looking for.

“He’s a very intelligent person; very articulate and really knows the lay of the land, and (is) already so connected within this community, ”said Whitaker.

Whitaker said Johnson had what it took for the managerial post.

“When you run a college outreach program, you have to be prepared to partner with the community,” Whitaker said. “Don’t come as a big university and ‘we’re going to bring these programs to you’, but what can we do to help the community with what they’re already trying to accomplish? “

About MSU Community Music School

The MSU Community Music School in East Lansing opened in 1993 as an outreach tool for the College of Music. It offers music education and therapy to everyone, regardless of age and ability.

CMS-D opened in 2009. It offers continuing education from kindergarten to adult learning for students in the Detroit metro area, Johnson said.

“What’s really wonderful about this program is that we serve students from a very diverse group, in terms of age groups,” Johnson said. “We are really trying to provide opportunities for as many people as possible.”

Johnson’s journey and goals as a director

Prior to becoming director of CMS-D on November 15, Johnson worked for the Motown Museum in Detroit, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Civic Youth Ensembles, Ohio State University, the University of Utah and more.

Growing up in the Detroit metro area, Johnson attended Southfield-Lathrup High School. Its group director was a former student of MSU Damien Crutcher.

“(Crutcher) really instilled a lot of excellence in me as a musician, and also really encouraged me to be a part of as many youth programs as possible,” Johnson said.

At Southfield-Lathrup, Johnson was Drum Major, Section Leader, and participated in youth ensembles through MSU, the University of Michigan, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and the Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association, or MSBOA.

“For me it was really important to be as much as possible in the community and really interact with people from different organizations,” Johnson said.

In his new role, Johnson said he focused on helping young people in Detroit, as well as making sure the community knows about CMS-D’s mission and the work it does.

“The power that the arts have to transform lives and to give purpose, to be a means of self-expression and to be a means that we can use to improve ourselves – that was my experience with music in growing up, ”Johnson said. “Anything I can do to help students find something similar is something that I am very passionate about. “

Additionally, Johnson wants to make sure CMS-D has the financial backing it needs.

“Make sure we’re on top of the latest grants,” Johnson said. “Being able to offer our courses and programs either at a subsidized cost, or in some cases even completely free, depending on the needs of the community. “

Whitaker said the College of Music is delighted Johnson is joining them as the new director of CMS-D.

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“We know it will be a rewarding opportunity to have him on staff,” said Whitaker.

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Detroit School of Community Music Appoints New Principal: Detroit Native Kristopher Johnson https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-school-of-community-music-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-school-of-community-music-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ [ad_1] When College of Music director of jazz studies Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroitor CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring committee were looking for someone familiar with the Detroit community. Christopher Johnson – a Detroit native, Michigan State University alumnus, educator and Grammy-nominated […]]]>

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When College of Music director of jazz studies Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroitor CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring committee were looking for someone familiar with the Detroit community.

Christopher Johnson – a Detroit native, Michigan State University alumnus, educator and Grammy-nominated composer, arranger and trumpeter – is the person they were looking for.

“He’s a very smart person; very articulate and really knows the lay of the land, and (is) already so connected within this community,” Whitaker said.

Whitaker said Johnson has the qualities needed for the manager’s job.

“When you run a college outreach program, you have to be prepared to partner with the community,” Whitaker said. “Not coming in as a big university, and ‘we’re going to bring these programs to you,’ but what can we do to help the community with what they’re already trying to accomplish.”

About MSU Community Music School

The MSU Community Music School in East Lansing opened in 1993 as an outreach tool for the College of Music. It offers music education and therapy to everyone, regardless of age and ability.

CMS-D opened its site in 2009. It provides lifelong education from kindergarten to adult learning to students in the Detroit metro area, Johnson said.

“What’s really wonderful about this program is that we serve students from a very large, diverse group, in terms of age groups,” Johnson said. “We really try to provide opportunities for as many people as possible.”

Johnson’s journey and goals as a director

Prior to becoming the director of CMS-D on Nov. 15, Johnson worked for the Motown Museum of Detroit, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Civic Youth Ensembles, Ohio State University, University of Utah and more.

Growing up in the Detroit metro area, Johnson attended Southfield-Lathrup High School. His group director was an MSU alumnus Damien Crutcher.

“(Crutcher) really instilled in me a lot of excellence as a musician, and also really encouraged me to be part of as many youth programs as possible,” Johnson said.

At Southfield-Lathrup, Johnson was drum major, section leader, and participated in youth bands through MSU, the University of Michigan, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and the Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association, or MSBOA.

“For me, it was really important to be in the community as much as possible and to really interact with people from different organizations,” Johnson said.

In his new role, Johnson said he is focused on helping young people in Detroit, as well as making sure the community knows about CMS-D’s mission and the work it does.

“The power that the arts have to transform lives and to provide purpose, to be a means of self-expression and to be a means that we can use to improve ourselves – that was my experience with music in growing up,” Johnson said. “Anything I can do to help students find something similar is just something I’m passionate about.”

Additionally, Johnson wants to make sure CMS-D has the financial backing it needs.

“Making sure we’re on top of the latest grants,” Johnson said. “To be able to offer our courses and programs either at a subsidized cost, or in some cases even completely free, depending on the needs of the community.

Whitaker said the College of Music is thrilled to have Johnson join them as the new director of CMS-D.

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“We know it will be a rewarding opportunity to have him on the team,” Whitaker said.

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