Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 04:07:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 Community Music School Celebrates 40 Years of Excellence in Music Education | The Valley Register https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-40-years-of-excellence-in-music-education-the-valley-register/ Thu, 12 May 2022 04:07:55 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-40-years-of-excellence-in-music-education-the-valley-register/ Photo caption: Community Music School teachers Linda Kistler, violin and Carolyn Gaul, violin perform at the 2019 CMS Brunch at the Lehigh Country Club. The non-profit Allentown will mark its 40and year of operation with its annual Spring Brunch fundraiser on June 12, 2022, the first in-person event since the start of the Covid pandemic. […]]]>
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Photo caption: Community Music School teachers Linda Kistler, violin and Carolyn Gaul, violin perform at the 2019 CMS Brunch at the Lehigh Country Club. The non-profit Allentown will mark its 40and year of operation with its annual Spring Brunch fundraiser on June 12, 2022, the first in-person event since the start of the Covid pandemic.

Allentown, Pennsylvania (May 11, 2022) – After two years of virtual events, the Lehigh Valley & Berks Community Music School (CMS) plans to return to an in-person event for its annual fundraiser this spring. On Sunday, June 12, 2022, the Allentown nonprofit will celebrate 40 years in business with its annual Spring Brunch & Silent Auction fundraiser at Lehigh Country Club, Allentown. The event, originally scheduled for May 1, has been postponed due to Covid pandemic precautions.

In 1982, Martha Maletz and four music teachers, Beatrice Allen, Jean Fox, Judith Moyer and Marilyn Pinschmidt started operations of the Community Music School in the educational building of St. John’s Lutheran Church on Fifth Street in Allentown. Their mission was to provide quality music education to underserved children in Allentown. In its first year, CMS had 7 teachers and 38 students enrolled in piano and voice and provided $5,604 in scholarships and financial aid. In 2022, 40 years later, CMS has provided over 25,000 student services in the Lehigh Valley with the benefits of lifelong music education. Now located in the former Lehigh Valley Social Club at 1544 Hamilton Street, Allentown, CMS offers private lessons to over 200 students in piano, strings, brass, wind, percussion and voice to students of all ages, from toddlers to the elderly. Over 50% of students under the age of 18 can only study with financial aid funded by generous local individuals, businesses and foundations. CMS is proud to fund over $60,000 annually in financial aid, scholarships and outreach. In the fall of 2021, the school received a generous grant from the Presser Foundation to help fund the construction and technology of a state-of-the-art audio and video recording studio. In addition to private instrument lessons, students can now gain hands-on experience with industry-standard recording technology through a variety of new CMS recording classes. During the pandemic, the school shifted to remote operations, online-only music lessons, and continued to offer free performance opportunities to students through their YouTube channel. In-person classes resumed on Hamilton Street in the fall of 2021 and new summer camps, show sets and performance opportunities are planned for the summer ahead.

The CMS Spring Brunch has been held at Lehigh Country Club for over 20 years and regularly attracts over 200 guests for an afternoon of fine dining, silent bidding and music by CMS faculty and students. “Funds raised through this event are crucial in helping to maintain CMS’s programming and student opportunities, enabling all students to access the lifelong benefits of a quality music education, no matter regardless of background, age, ability or financial situation,” said Brunch Committee Chair Julie Macomb, Esq., “I invite all of our arts supporters to join us as we gather safely – in person – to celebrate 40 years of excellence in music education at CMS, bid on great auction items, and enjoy amazing food and of course, music!”

Musical selections include classical and contemporary pieces, such as Claude Bolling’s Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano and Grand Duo Concertante, Mvt. III, op. 48 by Carl Maria von Weber. CMS faculty members who will perform are Linda Kistler, violin, Carolyn Gaul, violin, Elaine Martin, flute, Joe Wagner, guitar, Lou Czechowski, piano, Daniel Gonzalez, drums, John Schwartz, clarinet and Dr. Annie Tindall -Gibson, piano.

New this year, the gala recital will be integrated into the brunch and will feature the school’s most accomplished young musicians. According to Executive Director Jeff Reed, “Students get the best results at our gala auditions. The best of the best CMS. They must be recommended by their teacher and perform in front of an independent jury that evaluates their musical performance according to predetermined criteria. Students with the highest scores also receive merit-based scholarships to continue their studies at CMS.

A week-long online silent auction kicks off the event on Friday, June 3 at 12:00 p.m. Closing of the auction on Sunday June 12 at 2 p.m. The auction features a variety of items donated by local businesses and individuals, including works by local artisans, local restaurant gift cards and themed baskets for all budgets. Auction highlights include a collection of music-themed children’s books, tickets to the US Senior Open at Saucon Valley Country Club, a handmade scarf from Loon’s Loom, a quilt set and music-themed bedspreads, gift cards to the downtown Allentown Market, IronPigs Baseball tickets, and a week’s stay at a vacation property in Block Island, Rhode Island. You do not need to purchase an event ticket in person in order to browse and bid in the online auction. Auction winners who are unable to attend the event in person can arrange to collect their items from CMS after June 13.

Silent auction item donations are accepted until May 27th. Donations can be submitted using the online silent auction item donation form at https://bit.ly/3Ez1uKz. Auction donors will be recognized in the printed brunch program book, on the event website and, post-event, on our list of supporters at cmslv.org.

CMS thanks the Amaranth Foundation for supporting the Brunch as a “Sponsor of Excellence” headlining event. CMS also thanks the following “Opportunity Sponsors”: Allen Organ Company, CF Martin & Co., Klunk & Millan Advertising, Norris McLaughlin, PA, Peoples Security Bank & Trust, St. Luke’s University Health Network and Truist. Support is also provided by Julie Macomb & Scott Cressman, Carmen & Peter Flosdorf, Vance & Michele Powers, Tom & Fay Fenstermacher, James & Mary Warfel, Kathleen Matthews, Dail & David Richie, Tom & Shari Noctor.

The brunch committee is chaired by Julie Macomb, Esq., and includes Laura Burcaw, Carmen Flosdorf, Lisa Kulp, Jodie Hourt, Greg Kuhn, Carol Macomb, Jeff Reed, Dail Richie, Ellen Roberts, Mary Warfel.

For more information about the event, to book, browse the auction, donate, visit https://cmslv.org/brunch2022/ or contact Lisa Kulp, Associate Director, at lisa@cmslv.org or 610-435-7725 x402.

About CMS: Lehigh Valley & Berks is a non-profit charitable organization that provides inspiration and opportunity for all members of our diverse community to achieve excellence in music education and appreciate the transformative power of music. . CMS employs over 25 professional musicians who provide high-quality private and group instruction to students of all ages and in nearly every instrument, voice, and recording technology – in person and online. Through the support of our philanthropic community, for more than 40 years, CMS has provided more than 25,000 student services in the Lehigh Valley with the benefits of lifelong music education. CMS is proud to fund over $60,000 annually in financial aid, scholarships and outreach. In the fall of 2018, CMS moved its operations from Allentown to historic 1544 Hamilton Street, the former Lehigh Valley Club. The renovated space offers 12 classrooms of varying sizes, a unique parent lounge, early childhood room, music library, administrative offices and a 150-seat recital hall. Introductory group lessons, such as Kindermusik (0-4 years) provide the basics of music in a fun group environment. In the fall of 2021, CMS received a generous grant from the Presser Foundation to help fund the construction and technology of a state-of-the-art audio and video recording studio. This project leverages the unique aesthetics and acoustics of the school’s Dorothy H. Baker Recital Hall, the former dining hall of the Lehigh Valley Social Club, to create a live recording space for individual and ensemble musical performances, both instrumental and vocal. An acoustically treated control room and recording isolation room serve as a professional recording space, as well as an educational lab and classroom, with nine iMac computer stations where students will gain hands-on experience with technology industry-standard registration through a variety of new CMS Registration Courses. Learn more or donate at http://cmslv.org/.

Information provided to TVL by:
Lisa Hopstock Kulp, Deputy Director
Lehigh Valley & Berks Community Music School



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Bungalow Music School hits the right notes: an interview with founder Caroline Lazar https://giuliavalle.com/bungalow-music-school-hits-the-right-notes-an-interview-with-founder-caroline-lazar/ Tue, 10 May 2022 14:40:04 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/bungalow-music-school-hits-the-right-notes-an-interview-with-founder-caroline-lazar/ Bungalow Music School is enjoying success after opening nearly two years ago during a pandemic. In fact, the school just expanded to Nashville and hopes to have instructors in Austin by the end of the year. The local and online music school celebrates the successes of its students with its second summer showcase on June […]]]>

Bungalow Music School is enjoying success after opening nearly two years ago during a pandemic. In fact, the school just expanded to Nashville and hopes to have instructors in Austin by the end of the year.

The local and online music school celebrates the successes of its students with its second summer showcase on June 4 at the Greenpoint Library. In addition, Bungalow offers the first summer camp this year at pirate studios (110 Scott Ave) in Bushwick.

Caroline Lazar, founder of Bungalow Music School and a musician herself, spoke with green pointers on the school’s success with virtual classes, showcase and summer camp.

A student from Bungalow Music School learns to play the keyboard. Photo: Bungalow Music School

Green pointers: Bungalow Music School is thriving, even during a pandemic. You clearly know what you are doing. Have you always dreamed of opening a music school?

Caroline Lazar: Well, yes, I think I have. I’ve been taking music lessons since I was four or five years old. My grandmother was a piano teacher. After the piano, I started singing, saxophone and comedy. Music has become my universe.

Then I went to music school and got a music business degree. I came to New York to pursue my own art, but I’ve always loved children. I got teaching jobs at schools in Brooklyn and Manhattan, but I felt the principals were disconnected from the music teachers. They didn’t seem to understand what the teachers needed. Most teachers are also musicians. Sometimes musicians get a gig and they have to go to the gig and can’t teach on certain days.

Green pointers: What do you think is the most special thing about Bungalow Music School?

Lazar: Teachers! The basis of Bungalow’s mission is to have great teachers. I wanted the school to have musical teachers and I wanted to be flexible with them. When the pandemic started, everyone lost their jobs. But, I found a hack to help you: virtual lessons! Bungalow Music School was completely virtual for the first six months.

Green pointers: Bungalow offers virtual classes, as well as classes at students’ homes. Do you plan to have a studio in the future or does this method work too well?

Lazar: I find that most parents prefer people to come to their house. This makes more sense than dragging your child to a 30 minute lesson somewhere else. In Nashville, having a physical school will be a consideration.

Green pointers: Do virtual music lessons really work as well as in-person lessons?

Lazar: I think they do! I am constantly impressed by the students and their development. The children adapt so well. I think there was more of a learning curve for the teachers. One student, who lives in Brooklyn, has only ever taken online classes and has come so far. But it depends on the student. Some children cannot sit there.

Green pointers: What made you choose the name Bungalow?

Lazar: Deciding on the name was stressful. I wanted the name to evoke an image of community. I wanted it to feel inclusive. I actually went to the website and searched for ‘the most beautiful words’ and ‘bungalow’ came up. The word “bungalow” refers to a place and a house. I thought it worked well because I want people to feel at home at Bungalow and the instructors to go to other people’s homes. Everything revolves around the house.

A student from Bungalow is learning the piano. Photo: Bungalow Music School

Green pointers: This is the first year that Bungalow has offered a summer camp. Tell us more.

Lazar: Summer camp is a loose term. It’s an extended session with your peers. Many students did not collaborate with other students. Personally, I have never liked working and playing alone, so I want children to have the experience of working with others.

The camp will run from July 5 to July 22. It will take place at Pirate Studios (110 Scott Ave.) in Bushwick, where I do my rehearsals.

The first week is intensive in songwriting. Weeks two and three will include a DIY rock band camp for older kids. If you’ve taken keyboard lessons, you can be in the keyboard band, while a guitar student will be on guitar. For the youngest, the next two weeks will be devoted to exploring the instruments.

Green pointers: What is the summer showcase?

Lazar: It’s a recital. I use the word ‘showcase’ instead of ‘recital’ so the kids don’t panic. Kids don’t like that word. “Recital” sounds boring and stiff. Many children get nervous playing in front of a crowd. Especially after two years spent behind a screen! I thought maybe playing outside would be easier. I am very honest with my students. I asked them if they preferred to have the showcase in a concert hall on a stage or in a park. They all said park!

Last year we had our first showcase at McGolrick Park. It was the first time I had seen children in person. It was a celebration of children’s music. I want to continue with this goal this year too. This year we are doing the showcase in the garden of the Greenpoint Library. I hope it will look like a party.


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Music school needs money after finding a new home https://giuliavalle.com/music-school-needs-money-after-finding-a-new-home/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:17:21 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/music-school-needs-money-after-finding-a-new-home/ HENLEY Music School has found a base and now hopes to raise around £500,000 to upgrade it. The school, which has until now operated through local schools and private lessons, will be based at Trinity Hall in Harpsden Road and will have performance and practice spaces and instrument storage. Laura Reineke, who founded the school […]]]>

HENLEY Music School has found a base and now hopes to raise around £500,000 to upgrade it.

The school, which has until now operated through local schools and private lessons, will be based at Trinity Hall in Harpsden Road and will have performance and practice spaces and instrument storage.

Laura Reineke, who founded the school in 2010, hopes to be able to provide a musical education to all children in the city.

She announced the move at a special event in the hall attended by around 60 people, including director Paul Greengrass, who lives in Henley, Mayor Sarah Miller and other councilors and school teaching administrators .

The event included performances by Ms Reineke, a violinist, her daughter Ava, 19, and teachers, students and alumni of the school.

Ms Reineke said the school had grown significantly, with hundreds of children now receiving lessons, and she had been looking for a dedicated space for some time.

She said: “We want to prepare for the future and continue to provide this service to the city.

“It’s a fabulous space and we would like it to become a youth center but with music at its heart, a place that will have everything the kids need and they can do it here.

“This space is amazing and we want to keep its integrity but with the comfort we need to run a school. I started school in 2010 and it skyrocketed from there. We have grown so much that we now cover all the schools in Henley and there is no more space – we need our own space.

“We offer all kinds of musical lessons, with around 140 lessons per week.

“We offer full scholarships and many children have applied for scholarships, particularly in the wake of covid, and we don’t want to put limits on what we can do. It is vital that we continue to fundraise.

“Thank you to all my administrators and teachers.”

Mr. Greengrass, whose films include Bourne supremacy (2004) and The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), said: “According to Plato, music was the soul of life, it comes from within and nourishes the soul. One of the things I love about Henley is that it’s a music town, it’s a wonderful place for music and the school is a fantastic part of that.

“My daughter learned to play the cello and we had some wonderful gigs and it’s a very important part of Henley’s life and nurtured many young people so I want to thank Laura.”

Ms Reineke opened the event by playing a piece with some of the school’s teachers, followed by a performance of pupils playing piano, flute and cello.

She then introduced her daughter Ava who sang an aria by Mozart Figaro’s wedding.

There was also a performance by 13-year-old Eva-Mariia Pavliuk, who fled Ukraine with her mother Inna Krasnova and now lives with Ms Reineke at her home in Damer Gardens. She played the violin accompanied by Mme Reineke on the piano.

Ms Reineke said: ‘She plays my violin because she couldn’t pick up hers while they were fleeing Ukraine. She’s only played it once but she’s very good.

“As a school, we offer free music lessons to Ukrainian citizens who had to leave their country because of the war.”

Tim Hoskins, Principal of Badgemore Elementary School, spoke about the importance of music lessons for children.

He said: “It’s a pleasure to be here to support the school of music – it’s a little ironic because I have little musical knowledge, rhythm or talent.

“I’m not a musician, but as an educator, I learned the importance of music from my students.

“At Badgemore we believe that behavior is a form of communication and these music lessons have been helpful in so many ways.

“Within three months of starting these classes, the kids were performing in front of the whole school. Seeing their faces light up and hearing them perform was a pleasure and those classes defined their time at Badgemore.

Ms Reineke and the school teachers then performed a version of Eternal flame by The Bangles and Professor Stuart Lewins played the theme from the 80s children’s television drama Johnny Briggs with a trombone.

Ms Reineke thanked her friends and fellow open water swimmers Jo Robb, Susan Barry, Fiona Print and Joan Fennelly, known together as the Henley Mermaids, who raised more than £36,000 for the school by swimming together in the Channel in 2020.


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UMD School of Music’s ‘Classically Dope’ concert will mix hip-hop and classical https://giuliavalle.com/umd-school-of-musics-classically-dope-concert-will-mix-hip-hop-and-classical/ Mon, 02 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/umd-school-of-musics-classically-dope-concert-will-mix-hip-hop-and-classical/ Last April, there was a rehearsal inside the Dekelboum Concert Hall, and the members of the University of Maryland Wind Orchestra stood up, leaving behind their traditional seated configuration. Some of the student musicians let out deafening cries while others stamped their feet. And musical improvisation on instruments also happened. Nothing seemed planned and no […]]]>

Last April, there was a rehearsal inside the Dekelboum Concert Hall, and the members of the University of Maryland Wind Orchestra stood up, leaving behind their traditional seated configuration. Some of the student musicians let out deafening cries while others stamped their feet. And musical improvisation on instruments also happened. Nothing seemed planned and no one seemed to be following anyone else. It was organized chaos.

It was hard to tell when the musicians started and stopped: they played without a conductor, improvising as if each musician were a soloist. Meanwhile, I took a chair at the back of the auditorium, unsure if I was allowed to see this seemingly sacred practice. The unusual nature of the repetition made it seem personal. For the first time, I was more nervous sitting in the audience than I would ever be on stage. My cheeks were hot. I did not know how to receive this experience.

The truth is that I witnessed the original and creative thoughts, feelings and actions of student musicians who had had the opportunity to express themselves through the music of Julius Eastman, a black composer who died young and left a complicated legacy.

[‘Stick Fly’: Clarice presents dramedy on family and communication]

The wind band had rehearsed Eastman’s “Stay On It”. a minimalist composition that encourages theatrical and performance-based improvisation, but demands intense and strict concentration. It’s an advanced discipline to master, but the wind band will meet this challenge May 7 in the Dekelboum concert hall.

“I was a little scared about the whole thing,” said Dr. Michael Votta, director of bands and the university’s wind orchestra. “I have already improvised. I’ve never taught a wind band full of people – most of whom have never really done much improvisation – to try to do any type of improvisation… It’s about finding a way to kind of give them permission and empower them. During this rehearsal, Votta even walked on stage to improvise with his students.

Derek Maseloff, a music alumnus of this university and a composer whose work features in this program, shared that classically trained musicians often struggle with improvisation. Sheet music allows a musician to express himself, and even then he expresses the ideas of the composer.

“That kind of intense training and intense knowledge is a straightjacket. We are extremely, extremely connected to what is happening on the page in front of us,” Maseloff said.

Working with their main collaborator, Konshens – pronounced “conscience” – The MC, has been a challenge in the rehearsal room, as the student musicians don’t read the same “playbook” as the hip-hop artist.

Konshens, a Washington, DC, native and rapper, will join the wind band featuring his Classically Dope project to combine classical and hip-hop music. He will stand on stage with the ensemble, reciting poems and other texts that reflect the black experience and a broken justice system. He is a teacher, an artist and an altruist.

Konshens’ influences are derived from his experiences in Washington, DC, particularly go-go music, a famous local genre. He eventually made his way to the clarinet, but never fully committed to classical music.

His introduction to this idea of ​​fusing classical music with hip-hop and rap began with a wind quintet at this university in 2015, leading to his EP, Classically Dope. But over time, he pushed the needle even further and entertained the involvement of a large ensemble – ranging from 40 to 50 people.

[UMD students perform original compositions for New Music at Maryland]

“I was a little surprised at how the musicians…were…just to do something different”, Konshens shared. Soon he was performing on ABC, CBS and even at the Kennedy Center.

“We’re all in this together… We’re all on stage in something, and we have to make music together,” Votta added. “And here’s something that hopefully… [inspires] dreams.”

Maseloff’s play “Dreams” is the first on the program, which opens with ethereal, cloudy chords that lie softly beneath a syncopated texture of double reeds, all to complement the therapeutic, cinematic text that Konshens recites: “Dream like it’s your last breath.

The wind orchestra will also perform a composition by Joseph Schwanter, “…and the mountains rising nowhere. It begins with a thoughtful reading of Carol Adler’s poem “Arioso” from Konshens and includes shimmering and delicate whistles from various musicians, water-immersed gongs and the playing of water-filled wine glasses, non-traditional instrumentation but creative.

“One of the goals behind Classically Dope is to bring [different] people…and put them in the same room and enjoy the music for a while,” Konshens said.

“I was lucky enough to meet Yo-Yo Ma once,” Konshens added, after which Ma continued their conversation with a letter. “In the letter, he was telling me to be a person who recognizes the importance of culture and how to connect different cultures…is an artist’s duty…to understand how culture connects us all.”


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Edinburgh School of Music sees rise in lesson cancellations due to cost of living https://giuliavalle.com/edinburgh-school-of-music-sees-rise-in-lesson-cancellations-due-to-cost-of-living/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 10:04:24 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/edinburgh-school-of-music-sees-rise-in-lesson-cancellations-due-to-cost-of-living/ These students told the school they had to choose between paying increases in energy bills and other household items, or continuing to learn a musical instrument. Register to our daily newsletter Linda Boyd, Principal of the Morningside School of Music, said: “We have never had so many cancellations by people all citing the same reason. […]]]>

These students told the school they had to choose between paying increases in energy bills and other household items, or continuing to learn a musical instrument.

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Linda Boyd, Principal of the Morningside School of Music, said: “We have never had so many cancellations by people all citing the same reason.

“Over the past two weeks, several students have told us that they simply cannot afford tuition while all these other hikes are happening.

“It’s pretty clear that some have to choose between the basic cost of living and the ability to learn a musical instrument.

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The Morningside School of Music has seen an increase in class cancellations in response to the cost of living crisis.

“It is extremely worrying for those involved and truly sad for society that such choices have to be made.”

The school, which teaches a range of musical instruments to around 900 pupils across the east of Scotland, fears the cost of living crisis could threaten the arts industry.

Ms Boyd added: ‘With the costs of energy bills and everything else rising so much, there are fears that many simply cannot afford things like music lessons, or even going to the theater or a concert. .

“The sector has only just overcome the Covid pandemic, and many businesses dependent on the arts have not recovered.

Some children may be forced to stop learning a musical instrument due to the rising cost of living.

“It looks like the cost of living crisis could bring even more challenges.”

The director of Morningside School of Musicwho teaches children from the age of four, is also concerned about the impact of the crisis on young people and their academic success.

She said: “It could also have a negative impact on education.

“It has been shown time and time again that young people who learn a musical instrument later do better academically in other key areas.

“If families have to reduce that, there could also be longer-term issues.”


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IP High Court Dismisses Music School Students’ Copyright Infringement Claim https://giuliavalle.com/ip-high-court-dismisses-music-school-students-copyright-infringement-claim/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 15:48:04 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/ip-high-court-dismisses-music-school-students-copyright-infringement-claim/ (No. 10022 (Ne) of 2020, IP High Court (March 18, 2021)) Article 1 BACKGROUND The plaintiffs (those who operate music schools) sued the defendant (JASRAC) for declaratory relief regarding the non-existence of liability for damages for copyright infringement, claiming that the lessons and miscellaneous types of performances played in music schools do not constitute musical […]]]>

(No. 10022 (Ne) of 2020, IP High Court (March 18, 2021))

Article 1 BACKGROUND

The plaintiffs (those who operate music schools) sued the defendant (JASRAC) for declaratory relief regarding the non-existence of liability for damages for copyright infringement, claiming that the lessons and miscellaneous types of performances played in music schools do not constitute musical performances under Section 22 of the Copyright Act. The Tokyo District Court dismissed the plaintiff’s claim. The plaintiffs (the appellants) then appealed against the court’s decision.

This article discusses whether or not a student’s performance in a music school infringes the musical performance rights set out in Section 22 of the Copyright Act.

Article 2 DECISION

[…] Section 22 of the Copyright Act requires that the performance be made “for the purpose of being heard”. […]

(3) Musical Performance by a Student

In a music school, a musical performance by a student is given solely to a teacher for the purpose of seeking his or her advice and cannot be considered as being given to other students. Therefore, it should be said that a pupil does not give a musical performance “for the purpose of causing it to be heard” by other pupils, and it is equally obvious that the pupil cannot be considered to give the performance. music with the “purpose of making it heard”. he heard” for himself. […]

vs. musical performance actors

[…] For the reasons described above, although it may be said that students voluntarily and independently give musical performances solely for the purpose of improving their own musical performance techniques, etc. and that the appellants carry out certain acts of preparation and development of an environment with respect for the subject and the methods of the musical performances, it is clear that it is difficult to consider the musical performances of the students as those given by the appellants from the point of view of the essence of the students’ musical performances, which are given for the purpose of receiving instruction. Therefore, the actors of the musical performances of the students should be considered as these students. […]

D. Summary

[…] students’ musical performances are given upon payment of course fees by themselves for the purpose of having them heard by a teacher of a specific music school operator based on the course contracts; therefore, they cannot be considered to be given “for the purpose of having them … heard directly by the public”, and it is also considered that the students should not be considered to infringe the rights of musical performance

Section 3 ANALYSIS

In determining whether or not the students’ performance infringes music performing rights, the Intellectual Property High Court considers (1) who is the user of the music run by the appellant (a music school), and ( 2) if the performance is “for the purpose of having it […] heard directly by the public” (Article 22 of the Copyright Law).

Firstly, in view of the above (1), the Intellectual Property High Court cited the Rokuraku II case (Supreme Court, January 20, 2011) as the criterion for determining the user of a work, and ruled that the user of the music is the student.

With respect to paragraph (2) above, as noted in Section 2, the Intellectual Property High Court held that “since the Student’s performance is performed for the ‘purpose of making it heard’ by a teacher at a particular music school on the basis of the lesson contract, and for which the student has himself paid tuition fees, the student cannot be said to be giving the musical performance “in the purpose of doing it […] heard directly by the public” and it is understood that there is no reason to conclude that the student has infringed the musical performing rights”.

The conclusion that the student’s performance does not infringe the musical performing rights administered by the appellant (a music school) is reasonable in view of the fact that the musical performing rights are too broad if damages -interest is granted even to students who buy sheet music, pay the course fees and have a teacher teach them. The rationale for this is also generally accepted.

However, the decision raises a point of concern in that, as a finding of “by the public” (which does not include “exclusive groups consisting of a few people”), no grounds are mentioned as to why for which the teacher constitutes the “exclusive group” to the students (that is, the field could be defined as an “inherent relationship” between the teacher and the students).

This decision is a case that can serve as a reference as to how to consider who infringes copyright and whether that category of performance infringes musical performing rights (“for the purpose of making it […] heard directly by the public”).


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Ross Miller leads the Isle of Arran Music School Pipe Band in its first competitive season https://giuliavalle.com/ross-miller-leads-the-isle-of-arran-music-school-pipe-band-in-its-first-competitive-season/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 07:18:17 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/ross-miller-leads-the-isle-of-arran-music-school-pipe-band-in-its-first-competitive-season/ A bagpipe pedigree from the Boghall & Bathgate Pipe Band, the National Youth Pipe Band of Scotland and a BMus Trad Music – Piping degree from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, have combined to give Ross Miller a busy musical professional life as normality comes back into the world. He has his own roster of […]]]>

A bagpipe pedigree from the Boghall & Bathgate Pipe Band, the National Youth Pipe Band of Scotland and a BMus Trad Music – Piping degree from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, have combined to give Ross Miller a busy musical professional life as normality comes back into the world.

He has his own roster of students for one-to-one private lessons which mostly take place online, but also in person once a month at a venue in West Lothian. He is also the current secretary of the Competing Pipers Association and will be competing in the silver medal and round robin games this year. His Foot Stompin’ Ceilidh group is in full swing right now with 120 bookings for 2022 as people catch up with wedding bookings and corporate events that were postponed in 2020 and 2021.

Ross also has his own cancellations from 2020 to fill in when promoting his album, The Rokewith a tour in June this year. The Roke was released in early 2020 (and reviewed in Piping today number 100), but Ross had to suspend all promotions as the world came to a standstill for Covid-19. His concerts begin at the Hug & Pint in Glasgow on June 13; Linlithgow, June 17; Hootananny Inverness on June 24 (on the eve of the European Championships – all are welcome); Benbecula, July 23 and Sychrov Highland Games in the Czech Republic on August 20.

He is also a member of the Inveraray & District Pipe Band and has had to factor in a weekly band practice and a monthly weekend practice since November 2021, but things are about to get even busier. Ross said: “From now on we have gone back to two practices per week. Getting to this point, a month away from the first major, with just one practice a week has been nice. But we also have the pre-Worlds concert to prepare for, so rather than the usual four sets of music to learn, we have 20 this year.

“The onus is on the Inveraray players to show up with a working instrument and know the tunes and the band members have risen to the challenge. The band still sounds great, but with less band practice.

• Ross on the left of the Inveraray & District Pipe Band as they celebrate winning the 2019 World Bagpipe Championships • ©JohnSlavin@designfolk.com/Bagpipe.news

Ross has worked for the Isle of Arran School of Music since graduating from the RCS in 2017. Drum lessons are taught by ScottishPower drummer and former NYPBS member Thomas Barnes. The project was initially funded for three years by the Scottish Schools Pipes and Drums Trust with matching funding from an island donor. The original plan was to include as many children as possible in the project. There was also funding from the Scottish Government’s Youth Music Initiative which is administered by Creative Scotland. Ross explained: “This YMI funding was for Whiting Bay Primary School and every fifth, sixth and seventh year primary pupil was to receive pipe or drum lessons as part of the YMI provision. We also went to high school, Arran High, and every first-grader got lessons in bagpipes or drums as part of their music class. There were also extracurricular classes at Arran High which primary school students attended.

“The whole project has grown so that we now have a competing group and a development group. So my Thursday routine is now: take the Arran boat at 9.45 am, school fees at Whiting Bay Primary School , then go to Arran High for classes, then after school classes, then two group workouts. Then I spend the night so I can teach more high school classes on Friday morning. It’s gone, but it’s Great !

“We also secured funding from the Co-op Local Community Fund for uniforms, and the SSPDT has returned to provide additional funding over the next three years. It costs a lot to get two people in and out of the island.

“The project is really at capacity, which is absolutely fabulous, and it’s all run by a charity called the Isle of Arran School of Music. They provide Thomas and I lessons for bagpipes and drums, clarsach lessons, violin from the Arran Fiddle Club, as well as guitar, brass and woodwind with tutors sent by North Ayrshire Council. Quinton Black is the president of the charity who runs it all, doing a lot of volunteer work and helping raise money for uniforms, pipes and everything else. He is deputy director of six primary schools on the island.

“The Arran Pipe Band also contributed to the purchase of instruments. Our bands share the same uniform and some of our repertoire is shared, so about seven of the School of Music pipers regularly accompany their rehearsals.

“When I started working on Arran there were four students already playing with the Isle of Arran Pipe Band and having their experience as a motivational tool in the early days of the project was invaluable. and there’s only one person left in the competing group that I haven’t taught since the start, which is really nice from a personal perspective.

“I currently have 13 pipers in my competition band and eight in the development band, with 43 learning pipes and 34 learning drums in total in the project currently. I’m only there one day a week , and I can’t stress enough how busy I am when I arrive on the island every Thursday.

“We also run a leadership program alongside the music lessons and we have three of my students from Arran High School who give lessons to my primary school students. I help the three students take on a group of primary school students each week, where they teach the basics, and the three students will receive a formal music leadership qualification at the end of the program.

Ross grew up with a competitive pipe mindset as he was taught under the Boghall & Bathgate Pipe Band System and then taught under that system once he was in the Boghall & Bathgate Grade Band 1, and it’s that spirit that he brought to the Isle of Arran. “When I first went to Arran I knew we were going to have a pipe band and we were going to compete,” Ross said. “We were supposed to compete in the majors in 2020 but we are competing for the first time as juvenile novice B at the British Championships in Greenock on May 21.

“We are also going to the Ardrossan Highland Games, the Scottish Championships in Dumbarton, the Arran Highland Games and the World Bagpipe Championships this summer. The band will be lucky enough to see me play with Inveraray and Thomas with ScottishPower at the major championships, and I’m really excited for them to experience a bagpipe competition and see that it’s a lot more important than what we do on Arran. Hopefully, this will help them own the competition stage and motivate them to do better in the next one.

“I’m trying to sell them the dream of one day playing on the car deck of the ferry as winners heading back to Brodick, and you never know…”


The RSPBA published a list of upgraded, downgraded and new bands on its website on 15 April, with the Isle of Arran School of Music added to the list of new bands. The full list of changes can be read here.


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Community Music School Celebrates 30 Years With April 23 Concert – The Mercury https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-30-years-with-april-23-concert-the-mercury/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 22:19:21 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-30-years-with-april-23-concert-the-mercury/ TRAPPE – The Community Music School is celebrating its 30th year and to commemorate this milestone, the school has commissioned Philadelphia-based composer Kile Smith to write a solo piano work for debuting concert pianist Milena Urban during an anniversary celebration concert on April 23 at 7 p.m. in the Ingrid Larsen Evans room. The concert […]]]>

TRAPPE – The Community Music School is celebrating its 30th year and to commemorate this milestone, the school has commissioned Philadelphia-based composer Kile Smith to write a solo piano work for debuting concert pianist Milena Urban during an anniversary celebration concert on April 23 at 7 p.m. in the Ingrid Larsen Evans room.

The concert will also include a performance of a piece commissioned for the school’s 20th anniversary by renowned composer Jan Krzywicki, as well as outstanding performances by students and faculty.

The school’s founder, Edwina Pineo, will be present alongside other community leaders. The public is invited to join the School of Community Music for this very special musical evening, followed by a dessert reception commemorating the school’s 30th anniversary.

For more information on tickets, visit www.cmsmusic.org.

Community Music School offers programs for all ages. (Photo submitted)

During this anniversary year, the school’s founder challenged the school to raise $30,000 in individual contributions and graciously agreed to match those donations up to $30,000.

“The future of CMS depends on the financial support of people like you and me, as tuition alone is not enough to cover its annual needs,” Pineo said. “With our support, CMS can continue to provide scholarships or tuition assistance to deserving students and can invite talented artists to present community concerts. Our support helps keep the pianos tuned, the lights on, and fair salaries paid to faculty and staff. Our support is what allows this organization to continue to be our community music school.

Since 1991, the Community Music School has served the area providing music education and performance experiences to people of all ages, abilities and economic circumstances.

The Trappe site of the community music school houses 20 teaching studios and a performance hall with 200 seats. With over 450 students participating in music programs each week, the Community Music School has become the region’s premier resource for the highest quality music education.

Through private music lessons, lessons, ensembles, camps, a community concert series, and an art gallery, the school’s mission is to enrich lives and communities by providing an excellent musical education. , performances and cultural experiences. The community music school typically awards more than $20,000 a year in financial aid, scholarships, and free community programs. This year, CMS will award $45,000.


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Community Music School celebrates 30 years with concert on April 23 – Daily Local https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-30-years-with-concert-on-april-23-daily-local/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-celebrates-30-years-with-concert-on-april-23-daily-local/ TRAPPE – The Community Music School is celebrating its 30th year and to commemorate this milestone, the school has commissioned Philadelphia-based composer Kile Smith to write a solo piano work for debuting concert pianist Milena Urban during an anniversary celebration concert on April 23 at 7 p.m. in the Ingrid Larsen Evans room. The concert […]]]>

TRAPPE – The Community Music School is celebrating its 30th year and to commemorate this milestone, the school has commissioned Philadelphia-based composer Kile Smith to write a solo piano work for debuting concert pianist Milena Urban during an anniversary celebration concert on April 23 at 7 p.m. in the Ingrid Larsen Evans room.

The concert will also include a performance of a piece commissioned for the school’s 20th anniversary by renowned composer Jan Krzywicki, as well as outstanding performances by students and faculty.

The school’s founder, Edwina Pineo, will be present alongside other community leaders. The public is invited to join the School of Community Music for this very special musical evening, followed by a dessert reception commemorating the school’s 30th anniversary.

For more information on tickets, visit www.cmsmusic.org.

Community Music School offers programs for all ages. (Photo submitted)

During this anniversary year, the school’s founder challenged the school to raise $30,000 in individual contributions and graciously agreed to match those donations up to $30,000.

“The future of CMS depends on the financial support of people like you and me, as tuition alone is not enough to cover its annual needs,” Pineo said. “With our support, CMS can continue to provide scholarships or tuition assistance to deserving students and can invite talented artists to present community concerts. Our support helps keep the pianos tuned, the lights on, and fair salaries paid to faculty and staff. Our support is what allows this organization to continue to be our community music school.

Since 1991, the Community Music School has served the area providing music education and performance experiences to people of all ages, abilities and economic circumstances.

The Trappe site of the community music school houses 20 teaching studios and a 200-seat performance hall. With over 450 students participating in music programs each week, the community music school has become the region’s premier resource for the highest quality music education.

Through private music lessons, lessons, ensembles, camps, a community concert series, and an art gallery, the school’s mission is to enrich lives and communities by providing an excellent musical education. , performances and cultural experiences. The community music school typically awards more than $20,000 a year in financial aid, scholarships, and free community programs. This year, CMS will award $45,000.


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Famous music school Takarazuka welcomes new students https://giuliavalle.com/famous-music-school-takarazuka-welcomes-new-students/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 18:33:46 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/famous-music-school-takarazuka-welcomes-new-students/ Teenage girls dreaming of future stardom in Takarazuka Revue, Japan’s all-female musical theater troupe, have taken the first step in their careers. The Takarazuka School of Music in Hyogo Prefecture held an entrance ceremony on Saturday, enrolling 40 new students this school year from April. They passed a very competitive entrance exam with a rate […]]]>

Teenage girls dreaming of future stardom in Takarazuka Revue, Japan’s all-female musical theater troupe, have taken the first step in their careers.

The Takarazuka School of Music in Hyogo Prefecture held an entrance ceremony on Saturday, enrolling 40 new students this school year from April.

They passed a very competitive entrance exam with a rate of one successful candidate out of more than 17 applicants this year.

At Saturday’s ceremony, only a limited number of people were allowed to attend due to coronavirus measures.

Attendees and senior students attending the event were also asked to take PCR tests beforehand.

Addressing the attendees, the school’s principal, Nakanishi Tatsuya, said he looked forward to them becoming active members of the Takarazuka Revue in two years’ time when it celebrates its 110th anniversary.

One participant pledged, on behalf of the group, to uphold the school’s motto: “Purity, Honesty, Beauty” and to strive to become a dignified performing artist.

After the ceremony, a new student told NHK that she felt responsible when she imagined performing with the Takarazuka Revue.

She said she wanted to train to become good at singing, dancing and acting.

Students will spend two years taking performing arts classes, such as singing and ballet, to begin a career as a stage performer.


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