Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:14:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 Special visit to Paisley School of Music for St. Andrew’s Day celebrations https://giuliavalle.com/special-visit-to-paisley-school-of-music-for-st-andrews-day-celebrations/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 13:24:32 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/special-visit-to-paisley-school-of-music-for-st-andrews-day-celebrations/ Young people from a Paisley musical had a special musical tour as part of St. Andrew’s Day celebrations. The children attending the Diane Mitchell Music School were delighted to welcome Diane’s daughter Rebekah Mitchell and Gary Blair – both are professional accordionists. Gary plays the accordion all over the world and travels the world playing […]]]>

Young people from a Paisley musical had a special musical tour as part of St. Andrew’s Day celebrations.

The children attending the Diane Mitchell Music School were delighted to welcome Diane’s daughter Rebekah Mitchell and Gary Blair – both are professional accordionists.

Gary plays the accordion all over the world and travels the world playing the instrument, while Rebekah trained at the Royal Scottish Conservatory in Glasgow and now teaches at Ardrossan Academy.

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The music pupils, aged ten months to secondary school age, learned all about Scottish music and instruments in the run-up to the National Day of November 30.

Teacher Diane therefore thought it would be a great experience for young musicians to hear the instrument which is commonly featured in many famous Scottish songs.

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She told the Express: “The kids really enjoyed it.

“Gary and Rebekah visited all of our classes which range from toddler through high school and they all really enjoyed seeing them and hearing them play the accordion.




“We had been using Scotland as a theme in our lessons for a few weeks now and thought it would be a valuable experience for the children.

“They had the chance to talk to them and ask questions about it which was fantastic.”

For more information on Diane Mitchell Music School and Studio, which is based in Brick Lane, visit www.dianemitchellmusicschool.co.uk or by e-mail to info@dianemitchellmusicschool.co.uk

Download the Renfrewshire Live app now for all the latest news, features and sports: smarturl.it/RenfrewLiveSocial


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UScellular spreads joy with a gift to the Joy of Music School of Music https://giuliavalle.com/uscellular-spreads-joy-with-a-gift-to-the-joy-of-music-school-of-music/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 19:42:25 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/uscellular-spreads-joy-with-a-gift-to-the-joy-of-music-school-of-music/ KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WATE) – UScellular is working to bring joy this holiday season by donating to the Joy of Music School. The company contacted the school to get their ideal wishlist. From this list, they donated a Mac computer and plan to donate additional equipment valued at $ 1,400. Knoxville DJ’s legacy continues with 25th […]]]>

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee (WATE) – UScellular is working to bring joy this holiday season by donating to the Joy of Music School. The company contacted the school to get their ideal wishlist. From this list, they donated a Mac computer and plan to donate additional equipment valued at $ 1,400.

“It will be a surprise, we hope to deliver it to them shortly before the start of the holiday season in December,” Wayne Mays said with UScellular of the additional equipment.

According to the executive director of the Joy of Music School, the iMac will allow their students to create music like the music they listen to.

“This gives hope because we haven’t had music lessons in the building for over a year and a half. We think that in January we will be able to open and take live lessons here and the kids will see that and they will rock, ”said Francis Graffeo.

The Joy of Music offers free music and instrument lessons to low-income children in the Knoxville area. At the moment, they are looking for people to volunteer to teach. Graffeo said the greatest need was for violin and piano teachers.

This donation is made up of 70 UScellular donations made across the country to help connect with local communities. Organizations ranging from hospitals to local Boys and Girls clubs have received gifts ranging from children’s toys to food donations for local homeless shelters.


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For 50 years, the Blue Bear Music School has been spreading the joy of rock’n’roll https://giuliavalle.com/for-50-years-the-blue-bear-music-school-has-been-spreading-the-joy-of-rocknroll/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 12:01:03 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/for-50-years-the-blue-bear-music-school-has-been-spreading-the-joy-of-rocknroll/ Krista Lotto (top), Mitzi Torres and Laith Frangoul during Spencer Layne’s Guitar Lesson 1 at the Blue Bear School of Music in Fort Mason. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle Blue Bear Music School, San Francisco’s original “School of Rock” topped off its 50th anniversary celebration this year with a unique gift from Jack Black. […]]]>
Krista Lotto (top), Mitzi Torres and Laith Frangoul during Spencer Layne’s Guitar Lesson 1 at the Blue Bear School of Music in Fort Mason. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Blue Bear Music School, San Francisco’s original “School of Rock” topped off its 50th anniversary celebration this year with a unique gift from Jack Black.

The actor, who starred in the 2003 fictional film “School of Rock,” recently joined members of the non-profit organization’s youth program on Zoom to record an effusive version of “Suffragette City” from David Bowie.

“A good friend of mine told me about Blue Bear and the amazing job they’ve done,” Black said in a statement. “I jumped at the chance to celebrate their 50th anniversary by jamming the Bowie with their teenage all-star group. So much fun. What an honor.”

As part of its celebrations, Blue Bear is also holding a fundraising auction until Tuesday, November 30, giving supporters the opportunity to bid on items including original Fillmore posters from the 1960s, tickets to Metallica’s upcoming 40th anniversary fan club shows at Chase Center in San Francisco in December.

Fundraising posters hang on the wall as Stephen Rosenfield sings during Kevin Mullane’s Everything Rock Band workshop at the Blue Bear School of Music. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Founded in 1971 with the mission of welcoming students of all ages and all levels, Blue bear taught tens of thousands of city residents how to play a riff, wear a melody, and navigate the choppy waters of the music industry.

The school is guided by Executive Director Steve Savage’s philosophy of letting its educators “teach as they want to teach.” The school’s 40 or so teachers include drummer Jay Lane, who performs regularly with Bob Weir and Les Claypool; Jasmin Moosavi, singer of the group Azar; and local singer-songwriter Francesca Lee.

Steve Savage (left) and Steve Strauss, founders of the Blue Bear Music School, pictured in 1996, founded the school in 1971 to help fund their rock band. The group only lasted two years, but the Fort Mason nonprofit school continues. Photo: Russell Yip / The Chronicle 1996

“It’s really driven by the people rather than any sort of doctrine or preconceived idea about what music should be,” said Savage, who also co-founded the school. “We want to empower people to play the music they love. “

On its campus inside the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, along the city’s northern waterfront, budding rock stars can sign up for private lessons, group classes, group workshops. or music camps, or – if they are under 4 – learn to shake a tambourine in a nearby park as part of the school’s Little Bears program.

Liana Holmberg, whose son attended Blue Bear’s Get Ready to Rock summer camp, happily reports that “it was the best camp he had ever attended, and his love for music was absolutely illuminated.”

The kids who jammed with Black are members of the Blue Bear teen all-star groups, Dietary Supplements and Hellaments, both of whom were educated in school. They are the last of the countless groups that have gathered there over the years.

“Blue Bear is an amazing organization and I love any group of people who spread the absolute joy of music,” said Matthew Cava, a longtime student. “It’s the only thing that has carried me for many years.”

Blue Bear educates approximately 850 students per term. It also offers free music education classes to thousands of other San Francisco kids through public schools and community organizations.

Not bad for an idea that was conceived as a hobby by a few members of the band who anticipated a completely different career path.

“The plan was to have a little music school and teach music until we got our big break,” said Savage, recalling his brief stint with the psychedelic era band Wolfgang & Strauss. “School was just a fun way to make money for us.”

His group broke up two years later. But for five decades, the school continued to serve San Francisco.

A 1971 photograph of the original location of the Blue Bear School of Music hangs at the long-standing current location at Fort Mason. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Blue Bear Waltzes School of Music toured several small storefronts across town – including the space on Ocean Avenue currently occupied by Zanze’s Cheesecakes – before shortening its name and becoming a staple of the Fort Mason Center in 1978.

But even this move seemed risky at first.

“For many years we thought we were going to be kicked out,” Savage said. “But we hung on.”

Over the years, Blue Bear has brought together several artists and groups who have performed at local venues like the Fillmore, Chapel, and Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. It has also hosted a series of benefit concerts featuring Mavis Staples, Los Lobos and Elvin Bishop.

“I was a classical pianist, but I didn’t even know what the chords were,” said San Francisco musician Bonnie Hayes, who signed a contract with a major record company and wrote songs for Cher and Bette. Midler. “My teacher taught me the chords and opened up the whole world of music to me. I was there as much as I could.

Mitzi Torres (left), Elizabeth Kidd and Laith Frangoul await the start of Spencer Layne’s Guitar Class 1 at the Blue Bear School of Music. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

The coronavirus pandemic has brought a new set of challenges for Blue Bear. When the city’s non-essential businesses were forced to shut down in March 2020, the school had to cancel all of its in-person programs. In less than a week, the school switched to an online model, offering courses with its 40 music teachers.

“We learned to use Zoom very quickly,” said Savage. “We discovered that for private lessons, it was not a bad alternative. But our group program disappeared and classes hobbled. We fell to about 60% of our normal income, which was a struggle. “

The school was able to survive, operating at a limited capacity, thanks to a pair of loans from the Paycheck Protection Program and help from local benefactors including the Hellman Foundation, which produces the free Hardly Strictly Bluegrass festival in Golden Gate Park.

Blue Bear reopened for in-person classes in the fall, but still operates with a hybrid model and is once again working to scale up its outreach program, which offers free classes and music education classes in underserved areas of the city such as Bayview and Tenderloin.

“It’s a fight,” Savage said. “Nonprofits are always limited, but we have a great staff and it’s gratifying to be able to do this work. “

Savage is already looking ahead to the next 50 years.

“I had no idea how crucial Blue Bear would be in my life and become what it has become, which I think is an important cultural institution in San Francisco,” said Savage. “I feel lucky and privileged.”

Ida Belisle leaves the Blue Bear School of Music in Fort Mason. Photo: Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

Blue Bear Music School: 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Fort Mason Center, 2 Marina Blvd., Building D, SF 415-673-3600. bluebearmusic.org




  • Aidin Vaziri

    Aidin Vaziri is the pop music critic for the San Francisco Chronicle. Email: avaziri@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @MusicSF


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Canberra-based music school teaching all students – young and old – to play an instrument https://giuliavalle.com/canberra-based-music-school-teaching-all-students-young-and-old-to-play-an-instrument/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 21:24:45 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/canberra-based-music-school-teaching-all-students-young-and-old-to-play-an-instrument/ At 76 and 78 years old, Canberra’s grandparents, Maria and Chris Adams, are proof that you’re never too old to stick with a man. The retired accountants have just graduated from Community Rock School at Australian National University. “We were laughing while filling out the application,” Ms. Adams said. “But then we got accepted and […]]]>

At 76 and 78 years old, Canberra’s grandparents, Maria and Chris Adams, are proof that you’re never too old to stick with a man.

The retired accountants have just graduated from Community Rock School at Australian National University.

“We were laughing while filling out the application,” Ms. Adams said.

Mr Adams said he would have loved being in a band as a child, but neither he nor his wife’s parents could ever afford to take music lessons.

Now among themselves, they play the ukulele, the guitar and sing.

“We love to play the songs that we remember because it gives us memories,” Mr. Adams said.

“It’s something that we can share with each other and with our eight grandchildren,” Ms. Adams said.

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The school of rock is led by Micha Forman through the ANU School of Music.

The program is free and open to anyone aged 18 and over.

“We will have very young participants coming out of high school, up to people in their 70s to 80s,” Ms. Forman said.

Students learn to play in groups and develop their own instrumental skills.

At the end of the four or 10 week program, the class gives a concert at the Smiths Alternative in Canberra.

Micha Forman is the principal of ANU Community Rock School.(ABC News: Toby Hunt)

“We have a lot of attendees who did music in high school or did music as a child,” Ms. Forman said.

“They say ‘my singing teacher told me I was no good’, or ‘I was never good enough to play the piano’, but they always loved music.

“It can be part of their life in a way that they want, not in a way that someone else has told them it should be.”

Sarah Walker, who has attended Community Rock School three times, is a drummer, but recently had the courage to sing.

She said she rarely takes risks as an adult.

“I think as an adult I’m less willing or less comfortable to make mistakes. But you learn, so you’re going to make mistakes, so it’s good to do it in a safe environment.” , she said.

“Trying something new with other people is really special and really hard to find.”

A woman with gray hair and bangs sits at a drums
Sarah Walker learned to play the drums in school and has recently started singing in public.(ABC News: Toby Hunt )

A group united by a common love of music

Ms Walker said returning to school with people of different ages and backgrounds was a rich experience.

“We all have a common interest, we all have a common goal,” Ms. Walker said.

“We’re all in the same boat,” Adams said.

“We talk about guitars, we talk to [the younger students] just like we talk to our grandchildren. They are good children, and we are related to them – and I hope they are related to us. “

This year had been a challenge, with the program transitioning online during the Canberra lockdown.

But the show must go on, and in January the most recent graduates will perform together in real life.

“There is something special about going, whatever your experience, whatever your ability now, we’re all different, we all love different music, but right now we’re playing this song, and it sounds great. and it feels good, ”Ms. Forman said.


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Detroit community music school appoints new principal: Detroit native Kristopher Johnson https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-community-music-school-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:26:42 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/detroit-community-music-school-appoints-new-principal-detroit-native-kristopher-johnson/ When the director of jazz studies at the College of Music Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroit, or CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring board were looking for someone who knows the Detroit community well. Kristopher johnson – from Detroit, Michigan State University alumnus, […]]]>

When the director of jazz studies at the College of Music Rodney Whitaker was looking for a new director of the Community Music School in Detroit, or CMS-D, he and the rest of the hiring board were looking for someone who knows the Detroit community well.

Kristopher johnson – from Detroit, Michigan State University alumnus, Grammy-nominated educator and songwriter, arranger and trumpeter – is the person they were looking for.

“He’s a very intelligent person; very articulate and really knows the lay of the land, and (is) already so connected within this community, ”said Whitaker.

Whitaker said Johnson had what it took for the managerial post.

“When you run a college outreach program, you have to be prepared to partner with the community,” Whitaker said. “Don’t come as a big university and ‘we’re going to bring these programs to you’, but what can we do to help the community with what they’re already trying to accomplish? “

About MSU Community Music School

The MSU Community Music School in East Lansing opened in 1993 as an outreach tool for the College of Music. It offers music education and therapy to everyone, regardless of age and ability.

CMS-D opened in 2009. It offers continuing education from kindergarten to adult learning for students in the Detroit metro area, Johnson said.

“What’s really wonderful about this program is that we serve students from a very diverse group, in terms of age groups,” Johnson said. “We are really trying to provide opportunities for as many people as possible.”

Johnson’s journey and goals as a director

Prior to becoming director of CMS-D on November 15, Johnson worked for the Motown Museum in Detroit, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Civic Youth Ensembles, Ohio State University, the University of Utah and more.

Growing up in the Detroit metro area, Johnson attended Southfield-Lathrup High School. Its group director was a former student of MSU Damien Crutcher.

“(Crutcher) really instilled a lot of excellence in me as a musician, and also really encouraged me to be a part of as many youth programs as possible,” Johnson said.

At Southfield-Lathrup, Johnson was Drum Major, Section Leader, and participated in youth ensembles through MSU, the University of Michigan, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and the Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association, or MSBOA.

“For me it was really important to be as much as possible in the community and really interact with people from different organizations,” Johnson said.

In his new role, Johnson said he focused on helping young people in Detroit, as well as making sure the community knows about CMS-D’s mission and the work it does.

“The power that the arts have to transform lives and to give purpose, to be a means of self-expression and to be a means that we can use to improve ourselves – that was my experience with music in growing up, ”Johnson said. “Anything I can do to help students find something similar is something that I am very passionate about. “

Additionally, Johnson wants to make sure CMS-D has the financial backing it needs.

“Make sure we’re on top of the latest grants,” Johnson said. “Being able to offer our courses and programs either at a subsidized cost, or in some cases even completely free, depending on the needs of the community. “

Whitaker said the College of Music is delighted Johnson is joining them as the new director of CMS-D.

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“We know it will be a rewarding opportunity to have him on staff,” said Whitaker.

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New Neilston Development Trust choir with music school https://giuliavalle.com/new-neilston-development-trust-choir-with-music-school/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 17:19:38 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/new-neilston-development-trust-choir-with-music-school/ A COMMUNITY choir has been launched in Neilston which hopes to reconnect residents and lift morale through music and song. Passionate singers of all ages and skill levels are welcome to sign up for the new group, which is led by the Neilston Development Trust (NDT) in association with Diane Mitchell Music School. The first […]]]>

A COMMUNITY choir has been launched in Neilston which hopes to reconnect residents and lift morale through music and song.

Passionate singers of all ages and skill levels are welcome to sign up for the new group, which is led by the Neilston Development Trust (NDT) in association with Diane Mitchell Music School.

The first session took place on November 10 at The Bank’s NDT base and in the future, meetings will be held every other Wednesday between 7pm and 9pm.

Jennifer Carroll, NDT program coordinator, told Barrhead News: “I first posted an article on our social media page during the lockdown, asking if anyone in the community would be interested in being part of a Neilston Community Choir.

“I was amazed at the huge response. It was clearly something that a lot of community members wanted to get involved in.

“The goal of the choir is for everyone to attend, regardless of singing ability, age or background, with a focus on fun and improving health and well-being. mental.”

Music school principal Diane runs classes in Paisley and Barrhead, where she currently gives private lessons in piano, violin, guitar and brass at the town’s St Andrew’s Parish Church.

Locally, she also offers an Additional Support Needs (ASN) course, Musical Adventurers, at The Bank, which is a combination of singing, playing instruments and sensory activities.

It is hoped that the funding will soon make it possible to offer this free or at a reduced rate to residents of Neilston.

The new choir is her latest venture in the region and will replicate the inclusiveness of the Renfrewshire Community Gospel Choir, which Diane helped start at Paisley in 2016.

“During the pandemic the Renfrewshire choir shut down and the numbers dropped, so we had a meeting afterwards to see what we were going to do,” she explained.

“I had been in contact with NDT and they really wanted a choir so with the music school involved in Barrhead and now having a base in St Andrew’s I thought that would be great.

“I put him on the Paisley Choir and with only a handful of us left they were eager for us to take this route. There are 10 that will be coming from Paisley and we will be doing a variety of repertoire material.

“I think with the pandemic people are still very low so hopefully this will be a good way to blackmail people again, appreciate it and build their confidence. Hopefully we can eventually perform in local venues. ”

The cost is £ 5 per session with block booking available. To register, send an email to jennifer.carroll@neilstontrust.co.uk.


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Brian Hurren of Runrig to open music school in Falkirk https://giuliavalle.com/brian-hurren-of-runrig-to-open-music-school-in-falkirk/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 11:47:28 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/brian-hurren-of-runrig-to-open-music-school-in-falkirk/ Brian Hurren of Runrig is opening a new music school in Falkirk in hopes of involving more young people in the instruments. The acclaimed musician and producer runs BHMA in Stirling, but now thinks it’s time to get Falkirk up to speed with the opening of his new studio at The Tattie Kirk, at 40 […]]]>

Brian Hurren of Runrig is opening a new music school in Falkirk in hopes of involving more young people in the instruments.

The acclaimed musician and producer runs BHMA in Stirling, but now thinks it’s time to get Falkirk up to speed with the opening of his new studio at The Tattie Kirk, at 40 Cow Wynd.

Students will have the choice of focusing on learning a specific instrument or taking the opportunity to learn the range of instruments they offer with keyboard, piano, guitar, drums, bass and tech lessons. musical.

Brian, who was born and raised in Falkirk, says it has always been a dream to have a school in the city.

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He added: “I had music lessons at Cow Wynd when I was young, that’s where my passion for music started. I was lucky that playing music took me along. all over the world and gave me amazing experiences.

“I would like to pass on some of that knowledge and that passion, where it started.

“A lot of people remember learning an instrument when they were young and for many it was not a pleasant experience, and they gave up.

“Yet young people love to join groups and work creatively with their friends. Music is a social activity, so we often put students in groups during class, we have found that this kind of peer learning works so much better than sitting a kid on top of theirs in front of a book for an hour. “

The venue, which officially opens on Wednesday December 1, is organizing a special open house on Saturday November 27, between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m.

For more information contact: hello@brianhurrenmusicacademy.co.uk


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New Studio E music school opens – The Scarlet and Black https://giuliavalle.com/new-studio-e-music-school-opens-the-scarlet-and-black/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 15:34:20 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/new-studio-e-music-school-opens-the-scarlet-and-black/ By Ohana Sarvothamsarvotha@grinnell.edu Erin Bustin, who has lived and taught music in Grinnell for 7 years, welcomed visitors to her new music school, Studio E, on Saturday, November 6. The opening was an opportunity for people to visit the new studio. Friends and supporters celebrated the opening of the new business as the students gave […]]]>

By Ohana Sarvotham
sarvotha@grinnell.edu

Erin Bustin, who has lived and taught music in Grinnell for 7 years, welcomed visitors to her new music school, Studio E, on Saturday, November 6. The opening was an opportunity for people to visit the new studio. Friends and supporters celebrated the opening of the new business as the students gave their first of, hopefully, many shows in space. Beyond just offering music lessons, however, Bustin hopes Studio E will help fill a void she says exists in the Grinnell music community.

“What I’ve seen in my years here is that a lot of families take their children, or adult students, to Des Moines or Iowa City for classes. At the same time, we have musicians who come to Grinnell several times a week, who are ready to teach, but don’t want to teach in home studios. Bustin’s goal was to bridge these groups of people so that music lessons – which already represent a big financial and time commitment for many – become more accessible to members of the Grinnell community.

The sad truth is that we are at a time when music is something we consume, and not necessarily something that most people actively participate in; there is this tendency to move away from participatory musical creation. -Erin Bustin, owner of Studio E

Bustin, who has been actively involved in music since the age of six, previously lived in Toronto, Canada, where she sang professionally and worked in arts management. Since moving to Grinnell, she has worked in various music related nonprofits and has given singing lessons at home. She currently teaches students between the ages of seven and 70. She leads a group lesson at Studio E called Music Together, which is an international early childhood music and movement program for children from birth to eight years old. His youngest “pupil” is therefore three months old. One of Bustin’s key principles in music education is that music is important at all ages.

“In my own experience, I find teaching mature students incredibly rewarding,” said Bustin. “The sad truth is that we are at a time when music is something that we consume, and not necessarily something that most people actively participate in; there is this tendency to move away from participatory musical creation. This means that when adults with no previous musical experience seek out music lessons, Bustin actively helps them seize that opportunity. “It really matches my own values ​​and beliefs around making music,” she said. “Most of all, as a singer, literally helping people find their voice is, I think, really amazing at all ages.”

Studio E currently offers one-to-one voice and various instrument lessons, with students having virtual and in-person options, as well as group lessons such as the Music Together course. “I hope I can expand according to the wishes of the community,” said Bustin. If the demand for lessons for a certain instrument is high enough, she hopes to be able to bring in regional music teachers to offer lessons at Studio E.

As for the future of Studio E, Bustin’s vision is for it to be a space that fosters the music community in Grinnell, especially after the isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I love the community development that occurs in music communities,” said Bustin. “After the pandemic, for music lovers, for those who participate in music, giving up singing together and making music together has been horrible. And so as the pandemic restrictions loosen, people want to make music together. “

The sad truth is that we are at a time when music is something we consume, and not necessarily something that most people actively participate in; there is this tendency to move away from participatory musical creation. -Erin Bustin, owner of Studio E

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Generocity Settlement School of Music | Principal Teacher of the Kaleidoscope PreK Enrichment Program – Full-time https://giuliavalle.com/generocity-settlement-school-of-music-principal-teacher-of-the-kaleidoscope-prek-enrichment-program-full-time/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 20:58:23 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/generocity-settlement-school-of-music-principal-teacher-of-the-kaleidoscope-prek-enrichment-program-full-time/ Posted on November 16, 2021 Site Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Qualifications: BA. Early childhood education. Two years of experience as a teacher in a preschool program. Responsibilities of the school principal: Provides all documents necessary for obtaining a program license under the regulations of the Ministry of Public Assistance and Education of the Palestinian Authority. Knowledge of […]]]>

Posted on November 16, 2021

  • Site

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Qualifications: BA. Early childhood education. Two years of experience as a teacher in a preschool program.

Responsibilities of the school principal:

  • Provides all documents necessary for obtaining a program license under the regulations of the Ministry of Public Assistance and Education of the Palestinian Authority.
  • Knowledge of and adherence to all Settlement Music School staff codes of practice, Head Start, CACFP, Keystone Stars, Philadelphia School District and NAEYC accreditation criteria.
  • Works in conjunction with all Settlement Music School staff, early years program staff and all other support service providers. Regular and frequent communication with the Kaleidoscope social worker of all information on the health, welfare, education and family issues of the children.
  • Supervises assistant teachers, parents, visitors and volunteers.
  • Orientation and training of new staff, substitutes and future teachers.
  • Curriculum planning and implementation in accordance with NAEYC Guidelines for Developmentally Appropriate Practice, PA Early Learning Standards, Keystone Stars Criteria, Head Start Performance Standards, and Curriculum / Creative Curriculum of Kaleidoscope Preschool Arts Enrichment Program. Provide and publish monthly lesson plans and reflections for the school year. Daily communication and revision of lesson plans with Kaleidoscope artist-teachers. Full participation in art classes and assistance in art education. Adheres to appropriate supervisory policies. Preparation and realization of all stages of the process of individual assessment of the child.
  • Fully participates in special events, staff meetings, research projects, conference presentations or other mandatory duties.
  • Facilitates and encourages positive daily communication from parents and their involvement in the Kaleidoscope program.
  • Sets up and maintains the classroom, orders supplies and inventory. Make sure all postings are clear and presentable and keep the classroom neat and tidy.
  • Oversees and maintains daily, weekly and monthly record keeping.
  • Participation and contribution to the planning, evaluation and professional development of the program. Seeks continuous personal professional development and supports the professional development of colleagues.
  • Performs all duties assigned by the Early Years Director necessary to support the growth and improvement of all programs included in the School’s Early Years Music Settlement initiatives.
  • Maintains a professional demeanor with colleagues, administration, children and parents at all times.

COVID-19 and workplace policy:

As of September 21, 2021, Settlement Music School requires all on-site employees to present proof of COVID-19 vaccination. Medical and religious exemptions are reviewed on an individual basis.

Settlement Music School is an Equal Opportunity Employer that encourages applicants from all backgrounds to apply for this position.

About Us

Founded in 1908, the Settlement Music School, a nonprofit organization, is one of the largest community art schools in the United States serving children and adults of all ages throughout the Philadelphia area and in line. Settlement provides over $ 2.6 million annually in financial aid and scholarships to 60% of its students. Settlement’s reach is broad and continues the principles of its founders, to provide accessible and creative arts education for all.

Apply for this job

Please submit your cover letter and resume by email only to: Tarrell Davis, Executive Director of Early Years Programming.

Apply now
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Arlington School of Music keeps the torch lit for 20 years https://giuliavalle.com/arlington-school-of-music-keeps-the-torch-lit-for-20-years/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:48:57 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/arlington-school-of-music-keeps-the-torch-lit-for-20-years/ The passion for music has kept the torch lit in Arlington through difficult times. The week Maura Lynch and Clyde Ford opened the doors to Mo-Co Music /Torchlight school, the attacks of September 11, 2001 shook the world. Many small businesses were unable to pull through despite the uncertainty at the time. However, the Arlington […]]]>

The passion for music has kept the torch lit in Arlington through difficult times.

The week Maura Lynch and Clyde Ford opened the doors to Mo-Co Music /Torchlight school, the attacks of September 11, 2001 shook the world. Many small businesses were unable to pull through despite the uncertainty at the time.

However, the Arlington company now known as Torch, provided a haven for their students through a shared love for music between students and teachers.

Since then, the school has trained students to become professional artists, producers, music teachers, music school owners, and sound engineers. Torch has also produced several CDs and videos and promoted numerous live events, dozens of which are held at the Regent Theater, just down Medford Street near the school.


Celebrate sunday

To celebrate its anniversary, Torch Light Music School is organizing an open mic party for the public, with entertainment from current and former singers. It is scheduled for Sunday November 21 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Burren, Somerville.

In 2020, the pandemic proved difficult for the state’s performing arts businesses, but the school has remained vibrant and connected to its students and community by offering virtual singing lessons online.

Most of the local business people were worried. “I was pleasantly surprised to find that our students didn’t miss a beat when we offered virtual voice lessons online,” said Lynch. “It was a fabulous way to offer advanced technical training while still being in personal contact with my students.

“We have a wonderful community of students and families here at Torch and we look forward to many more years! “

When asked about successful graduates, Lynch noted three from Arlington – Katie Pallotta Waitt was promotions director at a CBS affiliate; Colleen Nicholas has her own music school in Burlington; Serge Clivio, a Catholic graduate from Arlington, is a professional singer in New York; and Quinnsley Ava Raines was the prom queen for an LGBTQ prom on Buzz Feed.


June 9, 2021: Behind the background music of the Kusiaks

This economic news report was published on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.


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