Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 02:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music school – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 Athens Community Music School Provides Accessible Music Education https://giuliavalle.com/athens-community-music-school-provides-accessible-music-education/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/athens-community-music-school-provides-accessible-music-education/ Athens, Ohio is known for its many hidden gems, especially when it comes to music, and the Athens Community Music School is just one of them. Founded in 1979, Athens Community Music School, or ACMS, has been the primary source of music education in Southeast Ohio. Located in Glidden Hall, the school offers a range […]]]>

Athens, Ohio is known for its many hidden gems, especially when it comes to music, and the Athens Community Music School is just one of them. Founded in 1979, Athens Community Music School, or ACMS, has been the primary source of music education in Southeast Ohio.

Located in Glidden Hall, the school offers a range of private lessons to learn a variety of instruments, including piano, woodwinds, brass, percussion, string instruments and voice. Additionally, those who wish to work on their musical skills can also take part in group lessons.

“We have quite a variety of lessons available, and the lessons are one-to-one, so if it’s private lessons it’s just the student and the teacher, then if a parent wants to sit down, they can also participate,” said Wendy Blackwood, director of ACMS. “These classes are specifically for this student, so it’s really specific to this student. Lessons are weekly, so children spend a lot of one-on-one time with their instructor.

Although ACMS offers music training, it also strives to help people through music therapy. The school currently partners with the Department of Music Therapy at Ohio University, enabling people of all ages with needs to develop behavioral, emotional, and social skills through music.

“Music therapy is taught by a graduate student who is also already a licensed music therapist, so she is licensed to practice in Ohio,” Blackwood said. “For students who already have a diagnosis and who already know music therapy is something they’re interested in or their parents know it’s something they’re interested in, this is a great place to start.”

Blackwood was hired in 2006 as a piano teacher and became sole director of ACMS in 2018, supporting the school of music and promoting music education for those inside and out. from Ohio University.

“I think (ACMS) serves a very important purpose in the community because there are music teachers teaching private lessons in the community, but there aren’t that many,” Blackwood said. “It’s a great place to come and get qualified music lessons from the students here. We really love the students from our community who come to us and having the chance to work with them here on campus is truly rewarding. .

ACMS voice teacher Melissa Brobeck says she enjoys working at the music school and teaching all age groups, her eldest being a 75-year-old woman.

“I like working for the Community Music School (Athens) because there is a wide range of students who come here, and often there are people who just want to sing or like to sing” , Brobeck said. “It’s an opportunity for me to help them find their voice – literally – and for them to find a new way of self-expression and to learn something about themselves.”

In terms of voice lessons, Brobeck says they are very accessible to those on campus, giving people the opportunity to express their passion for music in their spare time.

“I think for students on campus, music school provides an opportunity for people who may have a passion or a love for music or who play an instrument or sing to continue their education while they’re in school here,” Brobeck said.

Students also agree with Brobeck, delighted to see a school of music so keen on fostering creativity and inclusion.

“I think it’s really cool that this gives everyone an opportunity,” said Becca Cundiss, a sophomore studying music production and the recording industry.

Blackwood says ACMS will hold its annual winter recitals to introduce music students on Dec. 3, and Brobeck recommends checking out their Union Chorale concert on Oct. 9.

“I think singing is very personal for a lot of people, and it’s usually a journey of self-discovery,” Brobeck said. “It’s so great to have the space to take these journeys with people as they discover things about themselves and their voices.”

grace_koe

gk011320@ohio.edu



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Community Music School Board of Directors Announces New Roles | The Valley Register https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-board-of-directors-announces-new-roles-the-valley-register/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 02:26:47 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/community-music-school-board-of-directors-announces-new-roles-the-valley-register/ Allentown, PA (September 21, 2022) – Community Music School – Lehigh Valley & Berks (CMS) is pleased to announce that Michael Yeager of Allentown was elected chair of the board of directors at the nonprofit organization’s board meeting on September 12, 2022. Yeager assumes the role previously held by Carmen Flosdorf, Vice President, Commercial Banking […]]]>
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Allentown, PA (September 21, 2022) – Community Music School – Lehigh Valley & Berks (CMS) is pleased to announce that Michael Yeager of Allentown was elected chair of the board of directors at the nonprofit organization’s board meeting on September 12, 2022. Yeager assumes the role previously held by Carmen Flosdorf, Vice President, Commercial Banking at Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Flosdorf served as chairman for two full fiscal years, 2020-21 and 2021-22, and will continue to serve on the board.

At the same meeting, the council also elected two new community leaders to its ranks: David Yagerwho recently retired from Guardian Life Insurance Co., and Elyse Pillitteriattorney at Fitzpatrick, Lentz and Bubba PC Both were elected to a three-year term by unanimous vote of the Board of Directors.

The Board also expressed its sincere gratitude to Board Member and Chair of the Brunch Committee, Julie Macomb for his service to CMS. A lawyer, Macomb is Vice President, Associate General Counsel of the Lehigh Valley Health Network and served on the CMS Board of Directors from 2015 to August 2022. She also chaired CMS’s 2022 Spring Brunch & Silent Auction, which saw raised over $36,000 for the Allentown nonprofit. 40e anniversary.

Michael Yeager joined the board in 2003 and has held various positions, most recently as treasurer from 2013 to 2019. After earning a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Kutztown University, he has had a successful 43-year career in the insurance industry. He retired as President/CEO of Community Insurance Company in 2021. Throughout his career, he has been extremely active in various leadership roles with the Pennsylvania Association of Mutual Insurance Companies, the Urban Insurance Partners Institute and the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies Congressional Action Board of Fiduciaries. In addition to his service at the Community Music School, Michael is a director and officer of the Lehigh County Housing Authority. Michael is a permanent resident of Allentown, where he currently resides with his wife, Donnamarie. Her daughter, Désirée, is a teacher and lives in Emmaüs with her two children.

David Yager retired in May 2022 after 34 years with Guardian Life Insurance, one of the world’s largest mutual life insurance companies. He has held several leadership positions in information technology, cybersecurity and agency distribution, most recently as assistant vice president/head of agency information security and governance. . He is a graduate of Bloomsburg University and a lifelong resident of the Lehigh Valley, previously residing in Allentown and currently residing in Laurys Station – North Whitehall with his wife Jessica and son Dominic, who attends Orefield Middle School. He also has an adult daughter, Keri, who resides in Orefield. Yeager is an assistant swim coach for Orchard View Swim Club.

Elyse C. Pillitteri is a member of the Corporate, Business & Banking and Intellectual Property groups of Fitzpatrick, Lentz, & Bubba PC. His practice primarily focuses on assisting clients with a variety of business transactions, including the selection and formation of business entities, investment transactions, capital raisings, shareholder relations, corporate governance, and corporate governance. business, purchases and sales of assets and the drafting and review of general contracts. Prior to joining FLB, Ms. Pillitteri was the principal of a boutique law firm in New York, specializing in the filing, prosecution and management of trademarks in the United States and abroad, as well as the enforcement and trademark disputes. She will use this experience to help organizations in the Lehigh Valley address their trademark and intellectual property challenges.

The leaders of the CMS Board of Directors for the 2022-23 financial year are: President: Michael Yeagerretired, CEO, Community Insurance Company; Vice-Chair: James Warfel, Ed.Dretired educator; Treasurer: Tom Fenstermacherretired chief financial officer, Hospital Central Services, Inc.; Secretary: Mark Stein, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Muhlenberg College. Directors: Safa Ashrafiattorney, Toyota North America; Carmen FlosdorfVice President, Commercial Banking, Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company; Gregory KuhnPresident and CEO, Omega Protective Services, LLC; Mary Hahnvice president of health and wellness, Bell & Evans; David Livet, Ph.D., associate professor, Penn State Lehigh Valley; Kathleen Matthewsretired senior director of business ethics and compliance, PPL; Bill MoyerPresident, West Region & Allentown Campus, St. Luke’s University Health Network; Elyse Pillitteriattorney, Fitzpatrick Lentz & Bubba, PC; Vance powersChief Financial Officer, Long Ridge Energy Terminal; Ellen Robertretired, volunteer and community activist; Dail Richieretired Executive Director, Berks Youth Chorus and CMS faculty member; Matthew TuerkMayor, Town of Allentown; David YagerRetired Assistant Vice President, Guardian Life Insurance. Faculty Representative: Joe Wagnerguitar, composition and recording.

About CMS: Community Music School (CMS) – Lehigh Valley & Berks is a non-profit charitable organization that provides inspiration and opportunity for all members of our diverse community to achieve excellence in music education and appreciate the transformative power of music. CMS employs 25 professional teachers who provide private lessons and group lessons to over 200 students of all ages, from toddlers to seniors, in piano, strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion, voice and recording technology; both in person and online. Through the support of our philanthropic community, for more than 40 years, CMS has provided over 25,000 student services in the Lehigh Valley with the lifetime benefits of quality music education and free performance opportunities. CMS is proud to fund over $60,000 annually in financial aid, scholarships and outreach. More than 50% of students under the age of 18 receive financial aid funded by generous donors. Located in the former Lehigh Valley Social Club at historic 1544 Hamilton Street in Allentown, CMS offers 12 classrooms of varying sizes, a unique parent lounge, early years room, music library, administrative offices , a state-of-the-art recording studio, and a 150-seat recital hall. Learn more about http://cmslv.org/.

Information provided to TVL by:
Lisa Hopstock Kulp, Deputy Director
Lehigh Valley & Berks Community Music School



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Music school is changing the world, one Rockstar at a time – Cross Timbers Gazette | Denton County South | mound of flowers https://giuliavalle.com/music-school-is-changing-the-world-one-rockstar-at-a-time-cross-timbers-gazette-denton-county-south-mound-of-flowers/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:48:03 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/music-school-is-changing-the-world-one-rockstar-at-a-time-cross-timbers-gazette-denton-county-south-mound-of-flowers/ By Brooke Wright, Contributing Author It’s August in Flower Mound, the air is hot and heavy. My kids woke up at dawn again, so I’m sipping my second cup of London Fog. I can’t help but smile as I look up from the score to Sara Bareilles’ “She Used to be Mine” to see 15-year-old […]]]>

By Brooke Wright, Contributing Author

It’s August in Flower Mound, the air is hot and heavy. My kids woke up at dawn again, so I’m sipping my second cup of London Fog. I can’t help but smile as I look up from the score to Sara Bareilles’ “She Used to be Mine” to see 15-year-old Addison crouched on the floor, one hand bracing herself not to fall, the another covering the huge smile on his face. I leaned back, “What thoughts are you thinking?” I ask, my hand unconsciously smoothing the top of my Mohawk half braid from the TikTok tutorial that has become a work staple.

“I can’t believe I just did that!” she exclaimed, “I didn’t know I could sing like that.” She buried her face in her hands, feeling the release of emotions building up as she got into the microphone.

“Are you kidding? Of course you can, you’re amazing!” I said rubbing my hand back and forth to calm the erect hairs on my forearm. goosebumps! That’s what it takes to be a true artist, taking an emotion and channeling it through music. Best of all, you evoked the exact same emotion in me by implementing more passion through your dynamic.

I rise, wearing my music director uniform – the eclectic collection of items bought to expose my inner rockstar status, flowy tops with criss-cross straps, distressed jeans, funky accessories, blingy tennis shoes and I leans into my embrace as she throws herself on top of me. “I’m so proud of you Addie, it’s huge…you finally found your voice.”

Brooke Wright is the Director of Bach to Rock Flower Mound and a faith-based songwriter, recording artist, worship leader and mother of two with a great passion for music and teaching children. (Photo by Lynn Seeden/Seeden Photography)

At our Bach to Rock, the recently reopened American music school, our goal is to teach children how to be a voice, not an echo. More than that, we want our students to embrace their own individual power. Most present themselves as thermometers, only capable of taking a reading and relaying the information. Using B2R principles, we teach them how to develop their thermostat ability, effectively changing the temperature of any room. Our program empowers students to find their voice, giving them choices and celebrating when they are brave enough to share their opinion.

Once the foundation is laid, our goal is to show them how to respect the ideas of others through our group classes: Rock Band, Glee Club and Guitar 101, where collaborative ideas lead to inspiring music. Groups are usually made up of four to six players and a singer and are placed according to their age and ability.

Belonging to a group at B2R supports the necessary growth of teamwork and positive social interaction that has been sorely needed as our community struggles with the aftermath of isolation in a post-pandemic world.

In my experience working with older children who are victims of environmental trauma, I have seen incredible healing through music. Achieving mutual goals during the band builds self-esteem, and frequent performance opportunities bring recognition from peers and encourage healthy competition, resulting in a strong sense of personal accomplishment.

We teach children to respect and learn from all types of music, even if it’s not our usual preference or taste. Top 40, classical, hip-hop, blues, country, gospel, jazz, a cappella, bluegrass, electronic and original music all have value, and they all belong at B2R.

As students learn to appreciate the musical tastes and preferences of others, we encourage them to become an expert at something, whether it’s choreography, lyrics, or even making sure the Everyone’s earplugs are in place before playing at full volume. This inclusive teaching method encourages people to look deeper to find value in their peers, which creates a safe place for friendships to form.

Bach to Rock Flower Mound just reopened in mid-June, but our staff are already making a lasting impact in the greater Flower Mound community. As we champion inclusivity, we have raised funds and reduced our services to provide scholarships to adoptive children and other families who would not normally have the funds or access to a spot at our Rock Band Camps. . B2R FloMo donated services to support local back-to-school events and PTA community fairs. Our Early Years courses are inclusive as we celebrate and embrace the abilities of neurotypical and neurodivergent students. Half of our staff are working towards their music therapy degree, giving them even more tools to pull from their musical tool belt as they lead EC classes: Rock City, Rock N Roll and Kids ‘N Keys.

As Addison and I leave the classroom, I’m warmly greeted by the energetic administrator seated at the front desk and as soon as my hands are empty, I turn to the tweens and their parents waiting in the lobby, greeting each by name with their own special handshake, punch or hug. It’s officially Rock Band time. My future rock stars line up, eager to enter the stage hall, the highlight of the whole school for their hour-long lesson. Inside, the spotlights are on and the stage is lit up as each student eagerly jumps onto the stage and grabs the instrument of their choice. The air is filled with a joyful cacophony of sound as bass and guitar are plugged into their amps to tune and the keyboard fills the air with the original song written the night before. The thresher adjusts her throne to the perfect height, stomps the kick and the hi-hat until all is well. I smile at the volume as I close the door behind me and make sure my custom earplugs are pushed in all the way. It’s a good day for making music. It’s a good day to heal.

Bach to Rock is located in the Highlands Ranch Shopping Center at FM 2499 and Dixon Lane in Flower Mound. If you would like more information on registration, a VIP tour of our amazing facility, or to help change the trajectory of a student’s life by providing collaborative scholarships to future Rock Band Camp students, please contact [email protected]214-396-8666, or visit our website at flowermound.bachtorock.com.

(Sponsored content)


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Washougal Art Teacher, Music School Owner Honored https://giuliavalle.com/washougal-art-teacher-music-school-owner-honored/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 19:22:53 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/washougal-art-teacher-music-school-owner-honored/ The Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance (WACA) named Jeffree White and Alice Yang as 2022 Artist and Community Member, respectively, in recognition of their “meaningful” contributions to the Washougal arts scene. Yang works as an art teacher at Cape Horn-Skye and Cape Creek Middle elementary schools, and White owned and operated Washougal School of Music […]]]>

The Washougal Arts and Culture Alliance (WACA) named Jeffree White and Alice Yang as 2022 Artist and Community Member, respectively, in recognition of their “meaningful” contributions to the Washougal arts scene.

Yang works as an art teacher at Cape Horn-Skye and Cape Creek Middle elementary schools, and White owned and operated Washougal School of Music before moving to Mexico earlier this year.

“It is remarkable to see the beauty and mastery of Alice’s students on display each year at the Washougal Youth Arts Month Gallery,” said WACA Board Member Rene Carroll. “And although Jeffree no longer resides in our community, we believe his contributions to art in Washougal have been significant and will endure.”

White and Yang will be recognized at a public rally, to be held at 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26 at 54-40 Brewing Company in Washougal.

“We are fortunate to have such talented and inspiring people in our community who are dedicated to promoting the arts,” said WACA President Molly Coston. “We are honored to recognize Alice and Jeffree for their significant contributions.”

Both winners said they were surprised to learn that they had been recognized by WACA.

“Being in my own home-based business bubble, I don’t always see the impact I’ve had on the community over the years,” White said in a press release. “This honor really means a lot. The people of WACA are exceptional human beings whom I admire very much. And I know that there are many valuable artists in the region.

“With all of the dedicated and amazing members of the community that I know are here at Washougal, I can think of so many more who deserve this honor,” Yang added. “I am both elated and honored by this recognition.”

White, a music performer and teacher for over 30 years, opened the Washougal School of Music in 2016, offering guitar, piano, mandolin, ukulele and bass guitar lessons through one-to-one in-person and virtual lessons. He moved to Ajijic, Mexico with his wife, Kelli Rule, a former WACA board member, earlier this year.

“I’m grateful to the families of the students who have supported us, and the community at large has really embraced the school,” White told the Post-Record in 2021. “This is absolutely No. 1 of my career. J got more success than I imagined. There was a good variety of challenges because everyone has different tastes, and (my students) made me work harder and grow as a musician and as a teacher.

White has also performed at many local events and establishments including the Washougal Senior Center, Washougal Art Festival, Washougal Youth Arts Month, Pirates in the Plaza/Park, and WACA House Concerts.

“I enjoyed the events,” said White, who joined the new City of Washougal Arts Commission in 2019. “(Performing) at the community center, Reflection Plaza, and at the library was really rewarding. We enjoyed the community, the friendly people. You can meet people and be on a first name basis with (pretty much anyone).

White joined the music scene in Ajijic, playing keyboards in a local jazz/pop band, working on a one-man show, hosting rehearsals in his home music studio, and performing with a bluegrass musician, a venture that could transform into a new incarnation of his band, Train River.

“I’ve been a performer much longer than a teacher, more regularly, and I’d love to look back on that,” White told the Post-Record before moving on. “Gigs around Portland have dried up for me, especially (because of) the pandemic, of course, but (Ajijic) has a very lively and thriving music scene. I could be in a cafe playing music several nights a week. I’m looking to get back into it more, and maybe start a few bands. I think I can make it work, especially with the expat community there.

Yang has worked as an educator for the past 17 years, all but seven as an art teacher, and recently earned a master’s degree in art education. She is a Fellow of the Columbia River Arts and Cultural Foundation, Washougal Liaison with the Clark County Arts Commission, and Coordinator of the Parkersville Day Event Student Art Competition, and plays a key role in annual events. from the Washougal School District‘s Washougal Youth Art Month. .

“Last school year, a second-grader asked me with genuine curiosity if I liked my job,” Yang said in the press release. “I said, ‘No. I love my work.’ The young people in our community are a daily source of inspiration for me. By building relationships with my students, I learn what their interests are, which in turn guides my classes. »

Yang said students, regardless of their future profession, can find a safe space to explore ideas, examine and solve problems, learn perseverance skills and develop empathy in the art rooms.

“Art by nature is inspirational,” she said. “My students help me maintain this momentum.”

After earning a degree in architecture from the University of Texas and working for companies in Texas and New York, Yang discovered her passion for education after the birth of her daughter, according to the Clark County website. Arts Commission.

“Art allows us to talk about our values, our fears and our joys,” she said. “Bringing our community together is more important than ever. With growing polarization, climate threats, and a relentless stream of horrific news, we can turn to art to help process these difficult times together. … I want every member of the community to feel important, valued and cared for. This will help us weather any storm that comes our way.


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A Central Coast Music School Can Teach You To Sing Or Play An Instrument From The Comfort Of Your Home | Projector https://giuliavalle.com/a-central-coast-music-school-can-teach-you-to-sing-or-play-an-instrument-from-the-comfort-of-your-home-projector/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 07:00:57 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/a-central-coast-music-school-can-teach-you-to-sing-or-play-an-instrument-from-the-comfort-of-your-home-projector/ The following article was published on September 14, 2022 in the Santa Maria Sun – Volume 23, Number 29 [ Submit a Story ] The following articles were printed from Santa Maria Sun [santamariasun.com] – Volume 23, Number 29 A Central Coast music school can teach you to sing or play an instrument from the […]]]>
The following article was published on September 14, 2022 in the Santa Maria Sun – Volume 23, Number 29 [ Submit a Story ]

The following articles were printed from Santa Maria Sun [santamariasun.com] – Volume 23, Number 29

A Central Coast music school can teach you to sing or play an instrument from the comfort of your home

By BULBUL RAJAGOPAL

COVID-19 may have compelled Central Coast musician Pete Pidgeon to open a remote music school, but the concept had been on his mind for years.

“When I was living in Denver in 2015, I had the idea of ​​starting an online music school. People’s biggest complaint was that if their kid was taking a lesson, they would have to take the time to drive to the lesson…sit for a full hour while the kid took the lesson, and drive another 20 minutes home, plus the cost of gas,” Pidgeon said. “I found a solution and got the idea of ​​Lessons from Anywhere that solved a lot of those issues that parents and adults had.”

But it wasn’t until 2020 that Lessons from Anywhere became a full-fledged business, even though Pidgeon ran a former music school in Boston in the early 2000s. The idea was pushed to the back burner because Pidgeon began to focus on his musical career. Now he juggles his band’s performances, Pete Pidgeon and the Arcodeas well as running Lessons from Anywhere.

TEACH MUSIC
Lessons from Anywhere Founder Pete Pidgeon credits his online music school with relieving stress and building confidence for his students.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN GRAFMAN

The online music school may have Templeton roots, but its instructors and students hail from remote areas, with a tutor logging in from Brazil. Pidgeon has invested time in recruiting teachers who know not only how to play an instrument, but also the often overlooked qualities that make good guides.

“I really interview everyone. There really is a whole process of becoming a tutor here. We don’t take just anyone. One of the biggest factors is that with teaching you have to have a training in psychology. You have to be able to talk to people and understand people, be on their level and understand them as a human being,” he said. ever had always had a human element to them. They were actually concerned about how you were doing.

The youngest student is 3 years old – a crucial period, according to Pidgeon, because this is when a Japanese musical philosophy named after violinist Shinichi Suzuki comes into play.

“The Suzuki method is primarily a pedagogy of teaching the ropes. It is also used on the piano, but when young students are learning, this style of teaching allows very young students to start playing the instrument, mainly the violin,” he said. “Also, in this age group, a very young child could start drum lessons. It is physically an easy instrument to play. Ukulele and electronic keyboard too.

Pidgeon’s oldest student is an 88-year-old man who started piano lessons a few years ago. He also has other students in their 60s and 60s.

“A common thing people tell me is that they lose track of time when playing an instrument. It takes away a lot of things in everyday life – stress at home, stress at work, financial stress,” he said, “They’re able to let go of their issues and enjoy their music.”

Lessons from Anywhere welcomes students throughout the year. Peak enrollment season is in the fall, when students return to school. Classes, which are mostly individual, generally start at 4 p.m. and end at 10 p.m. To register, go to lessonsdepartout.comcall (877) 3-LESSON or text/call (805) 222-6787.

The online music school not only teaches every instrument that Pidgeon can find a tutor for, but also offers lessons in vocals, music theory, and songwriting.

“There is something really therapeutic about playing music. Now that we are suffering from things like rising food prices, gas price inflation, the stress of war, political turmoil and all that goes on in daily life, what music offer is a respite from that,” he said. “Even if you only have 15 minutes a day, pick up your instrument and immerse yourself in the music; it does an incredible amount for reducing stress and anxiety. For children, it stimulates something in the brain to increase learning ability and confidence.

Underline

The League of California Cities announced that Buellton has been awarded the prestigious 2022 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in Economic Development through the Arts for establishing an Arts and Culture Committee, which brings arts and culture projects to the city and surrounding areas. Long known as “Servicetown, USA”, many drivers considered Buellton to be a stopping point when traveling the 101 freeway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. To change this narrative, the city formed the Arts and Culture Committee. In addition to providing permanent art installations, live performances, educational opportunities and interactive cultural experiences for the Buellton community, the program also supports local artists, businesses and community organizations, and helps tourists and other visitors discover what Buellton has to offer.

Contact editor Bulbul Rajagopal of the Sun’s sister newspaper, New Times, at brajagopal@newtimesslo.com.


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Henley School of Music struggles to secure funding https://giuliavalle.com/henley-school-of-music-struggles-to-secure-funding/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 10:28:24 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/henley-school-of-music-struggles-to-secure-funding/ Henley Music School, a local charity offering all forms of music education to all, regardless of age, ability, background or means, and like many other charities, is struggling to find a funding. Laura Reineke, Founder and Director of HMS says: “HMS now has over 800 children and 100 adults involved in its activities. Every music […]]]>

Henley Music School, a local charity offering all forms of music education to all, regardless of age, ability, background or means, and like many other charities, is struggling to find a funding.

Laura Reineke, Founder and Director of HMS says: “HMS now has over 800 children and 100 adults involved in its activities. Every music room in the school is full and we have a list of students waiting for teaching space! We teach music in the classroom, run school music clubs, choirs as well as individual instrument lessons and now have contact with almost every primary age child at least once during their primary school education. . We offer free specialized piano lessons for people with autism, as well as free lessons for displaced Ukrainian citizens. Over the past 2/3 years, with COVID, the escalating cost of living, and people supporting the plight of the Ukrainian people, the battle to raise funds for running costs has been an uphill battle, and we are desperately low, to the point where I can’t pass scholarships (of which we already have over 40) or buy instruments until we get additional funds.

The charity has secured Trinity Hall which they plan to refurbish and use as a community centre, with music at its heart. This will include not only musical activities, but a kids homework club, child/teen counsellor, youth club, rehearsals, local food pantry, refugee support and a beautiful venue for all activities and community support. Laura adds: “We are only at the stage of putting all the legal aspects in place, so we have a massive fundraising campaign ahead of us which could amount to up to £1million! None of this can go forward without our day-to-day funds.

The charity needs around £60,000 a year to deliver its existing supply in the Henley area. Laura explains: “Overall we are going to be down to a loss of £23,000 this year if we can’t get funds quickly. So any offer of funds, help or ideas would be gratefully received. At Henley Music School we believe that happy children learn, everyone should have the opportunity to learn, enjoy and benefit from music education, regardless of their circumstances. That is why, with all our activities, we offer a free loan of an instrument and scholarships of up to 100%. It would be heartbreaking to see this stop, as we are passionate about putting no barriers in the way of music education.

As it’s back to school, registration is open for private lessons, school clubs, the Youth Orchestra (an intermediate orchestra inclusive for all), Sunday Strings and HMS Sundays. All information and registration forms are on www.henleymusicschool.co.uk

If you think you can help in any way, please contact Laura on henleymusicschool@gmail.com


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TIDAL School of Music aims to create a new generation of kids who can identify Miles Davis and read a map https://giuliavalle.com/tidal-school-of-music-aims-to-create-a-new-generation-of-kids-who-can-identify-miles-davis-and-read-a-map/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 07:14:45 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/tidal-school-of-music-aims-to-create-a-new-generation-of-kids-who-can-identify-miles-davis-and-read-a-map/ This should have happened a long time ago, but better late than never. TIDAL is clearly aware that the next generation of music listeners are educated on TikTok and their exposure to the past 100 years of listen-worthy music is rather limited. If we are to develop the next generation of audiophiles or sound-conscious consumers, […]]]>

This should have happened a long time ago, but better late than never. TIDAL is clearly aware that the next generation of music listeners are educated on TikTok and their exposure to the past 100 years of listen-worthy music is rather limited.

If we are to develop the next generation of audiophiles or sound-conscious consumers, that will only happen if we expand their minds to a much larger world and to the composers, songwriters and musicians who preceded Drake and DJ Khalid.

We also really like the focus on world music and teaching kids around the world and where a lot of great music comes from.

Our education system has failed miserably for this purpose and anything that helps children locate Tel Aviv, Hong Kong, Buenos Aires and Prague on a map is a great idea.

Lean

Launching global music and entertainment streaming service TIDAL today Music schoola new learning hub that offers subscribers captivating playlists inspired by unique genres and geographies.

Content from the new Learning Center will expand TIDAL’s existing 101 playlist series, highlighting the origins and history of the music and instruments that shape today’s most popular sounds.

The TIDAL School of Music will host TIDAL’s carefully curated editorial content, designed to expand members’ knowledge and appreciation across all genres. Members can expect playlists to be regularly updated and expanded.

Music School Hub Components:

FOR KIDS: Playlists that offer introductions to musical genres (without explicit language/theme) for children through fun and engaging songs, including classics such as “Life Is a Highway” by Rascal Flatts, “Try Everything” by Shakira, ” U Can’t Touch This” by MC Hammer, and more!

genre for beginners: 20 foundational tracks from all major genres including Country, Metal, Dance, K-Pop, Folk & Americana.

GEOGRAPHY FOR BEGINNERS: 20 tracks from markets around the world selected by local publishers to serve as an introduction to music from around the world, including Croatia, Brazil, Ireland, Canada, and more.

DIVE DEEPER: Playlists that serve as an introduction to more than 90 subgenres, from Drill Rap (“Welcome to the Party” by Pop Smoke) to Latin Jazz (“Mambo Gozon” by Tito Puente) via Death Metal (“Slowly We Rot” from Obituary).

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MUSICOLOGY: Playlists that explore how famous instruments, like the Gibson SG guitar, Fender Rhodes electric piano, and even the cowbell, have been used in music over the decades, across all genres. Songs featured in this category include Van Halen’s “Dance The Night Away”, AC/DC’s “Back In Black”, Stevie Wonder’s “All I Do”, and more!

“As musical trends change, the fundamental sounds highlighted in these playlists will continue to shape music for years to come. As listeners, knowing this story builds a deeper appreciation and elevates the connection between artists and fans,” said Tony Gervino, TIDAL’s Executive Vice President and Editor-in-Chief for Programming and Editorial. “Through content like Music School, we’re doubling down on our mission to prioritize to artists and music fans by creating new ways to listen to and experience new music.”

Music School is TIDAL’s latest back-to-school offering. On August 15, TIDAL launched a series of curated playlists centered around various mental health issues people may experience during the back-to-school season, including find the words, The best is yet to comeand You will be fine to help people of all ages during this time.

TIDAL offers music lovers unlimited access to a massive catalog of over 90 million titles across all genres, 450,000 music videos, thousands of playlists carefully curated by TIDAL’s seasoned editorial team, and hundreds of live events. direct.

Music fans can access TIDAL through a range of membership options including; Free with a minimum of interruptions, Hifi stereo with uninterrupted access to HiFi sound quality and offline capabilities, and Hi-Fi More which also provides access to best-in-class immersive sound formats.

Learn more about TIDAL and subscribe at tide.com.

Related reading:

TIDAL Launches HiFi Plus: Better for Artists and Listeners

Spotify HiFi and some wishful thinking

Apple Music upgrades lossless audio and Dolby Atmos at no extra cost


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Kingwood Music School brings the joy of music to students of all ages https://giuliavalle.com/kingwood-music-school-brings-the-joy-of-music-to-students-of-all-ages/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/kingwood-music-school-brings-the-joy-of-music-to-students-of-all-ages/ When the COVID-19 pandemic forced many businesses to close across the state in March 2020, Janice Fehlauer and Carlos Gaviria — who took over leadership of Kingwood Music School in 2013 — said they were proud to to be able to provide structure in a time that was defined by uncertainty. “We wanted to create […]]]>

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced many businesses to close across the state in March 2020, Janice Fehlauer and Carlos Gaviria — who took over leadership of Kingwood Music School in 2013 — said they were proud to to be able to provide structure in a time that was defined by uncertainty.

“We wanted to create a sense of normalcy because everything was so scary,” Gaviria said, noting that the school didn’t have to cancel a single lesson during the shutdown.

While Kingwood Music School has been a staple in the area since 1986, the couple didn’t buy the business until after they each earned their doctorates in music from the University of Houston.

Although Fehlauer and Gaviria play piano and double bass, respectively, they said the school provides lessons for just about any instrument.

“We have over 25 teachers, and we teach just about anything, including the obscure [instruments], like accordion, mandolin and banjo,” Fehlauer said. “We mainly offer individual lessons, because in this way the teacher really adapts [lessons] to the student, and the student plays the pieces he wants to play.

Fehlauer and Gaviria have extensive music and teaching experience; however, their paths to the industry were not alike. While Fehlauer was raised in a musical family, Gaviria said he considered music a hobby as he pursued a career as a doctor.

“I spent three years [studying medicine] and I realized that I just wanted to do music for the rest of my life,” he said. “I didn’t have the initial training, but I kind of caught up.”

Gaviria noted that while there’s a lot to be said for self-taught musicians, he said having an instructor available for lessons is an invaluable resource.

“With an instructor, they can tell you, ‘Hey, we can try A, or we can try B, but C, D, and F aren’t such a good idea,'” Gaviria said. “It speeds up your progress and gives you an organized and methodical way to approach the instrument.”

According to Fehlauer, the music school focuses on providing musicians with the tools they need to make music a lifelong passion.

“We really believe in music school in teaching music literacy, music theory, giving students all the tools they need,” she said. “The most of [the students] don’t become professional musicians, but when they go off to college or whatever they do, we want them to be able to keep playing.

Although many of the school’s students are young, Fehlauer said some are well into their 80s. No matter their age, Fehlauer said she feels the same pride for each student as they progress in their art and perform in recitals.

“Music is such a gradual learning process,” Fehlauer said. “You can’t just cram in one night and suddenly you can play. It must be that daily drip. I think it’s a very good thing for students to learn.

Kingwood School of Music

3427 W. Lake Houston Parkway, Kingwood

281-360-9888

www.kingwoodmusicschool.com

Opening hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10am-8.30pm, Fri 10am-7pm, Sat 9am-2pm, closed Sun.


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Excitement building for the new home of the North Valley School of Music https://giuliavalle.com/excitement-building-for-the-new-home-of-the-north-valley-school-of-music/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 18:28:46 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/excitement-building-for-the-new-home-of-the-north-valley-school-of-music/ After more than a decade of discussions and planning, North Valley Music School is finally considering a breakthrough date for its new Whitefish facility that will give the local institution a chance to expand to better meet future needs and improve its current offerings for music. students in the Flathead Valley. The music school hopes […]]]>

After more than a decade of discussions and planning, North Valley Music School is finally considering a breakthrough date for its new Whitefish facility that will give the local institution a chance to expand to better meet future needs and improve its current offerings for music. students in the Flathead Valley.

The music school hopes to break new ground in the spring of 2023 at its Smith Fields grounds and as the renderings continue to take shape, the school’s fundraising campaign to fund the project is moving forward, including during the ongoing Great Fish Community Challenge. .

To date, the school has raised $2.8 million in pledges. The objective of the project is 5 million dollars, including 4 million dollars for the construction of the new building and 1 million dollars for an endowment.

Renderings showcasing the design of the new North Valley Music School building. Image by LSW Architects

“We hope to keep things around $5 million, and including a $1 million endowment to help pay for the expansion, general operating costs to go from 2,700 square feet to 9,000 square feet” , said executive director Deidre Corson. . At best, Corson said the new building could open in fall 2024.

The new facility will have up to 16 private studios, including four larger studios for grand pianos, percussion instruments and recording space. There will also be a classroom for large groups, a multi-purpose room, staff offices and the building will be Americans with Disabilities Act compliant and have adequate parking.

Going back to 2006, Corson says discussions began among school board members about whether it needed to expand from its current location on Spokane Avenue. The current school house is, in fact, a house that Corson says is around 100 years old. It has been converted to allow the teaching of music, sometimes imperfectly. Due to soundproofing issues, electric drum sets are used for drum lessons, and instrument storage may require some improvisation.

“Right now we’re putting guitars, violins, and ukuleles upstairs in closets where we can find space,” Corson said. “If someone is playing electric bass upstairs, you can hear it downstairs.”

Ed Harrington, left, and Christian Johnson perform during the weekly bluegrass and fiddle jam session at North Valley Music School in Whitefish on August 16, 2022. Hunter D’Antuono | flathead beacon

As former executive director and board member Cameron Blake said, “For the first time in the school’s history, we will be operating in a building purpose-built for music.

Blake has been involved with the school for years and her relationship with the North Valley Music School is particularly personal as three of her children learned music there. They are now adults and Blake described a kind of comfort that their musical knowledge brings him.

“None of them are professional musicians, but I feel like it gave them another language and something they’re good at and something they do often, that it’s whether it’s playing guitar in college for relaxation or jumping into a fiddle band.”

To meet the demand for music lessons that exceeded the capacity of that original building, the school rented space at the First Presbyterian Church up the street. Currently, the school’s 20 faculty and staff see a combined 350 students per week, most of them from Whitefish, but some also from Columbia Falls and Kalispell.

The Valley’s growing population has helped the school come into contact with students, but Corson also said a trend she’s noticed is an increase in the number of mature students, which she says , might in part have something to do with how much music has helped people through the pandemic.

“I think historically there’s always been an interest in parents getting their kids involved in music lessons,” Corson said. “I think the change we’re seeing now is that there are more adults realizing, ‘I’ve had a guitar for 20 years and I want to learn how to play it.’ “I used to take piano lessons and I want to get back into it. I think there’s a renewed love for the arts and the impact the arts have on human beings.”

In addition to the practical needs a building built for music will provide, Corson said she believes the new facility will help improve the quality of programs and lessons. The new building will have nearly 20 indoor performance spaces, including official studios built for music education.

For years, it was desired that the school would move somewhere in downtown Whitefish, but nothing ever materialized. In 2019, Corson said Don Bestwick of the youth athletics nonprofit Project Whitefish Kids approached Corson and a few other people involved with the school and offered to use land at Smith Fields which was too small to accommodate a football pitch. Corson said she liked the idea and things grew from there.

“It really came to fruition after 16 years of many different places and many different renderings. And the time has come,” Corson said. “We have some super excited people about it. ‘them.


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North Valley Music School offers fall music programs https://giuliavalle.com/north-valley-music-school-offers-fall-music-programs/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:08:35 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/north-valley-music-school-offers-fall-music-programs/ The North Valley School of Music begins the 2022-2023 program year with a fall schedule full of diverse and inclusive music programs and invites the community to register. The nonprofit music school combines high-quality instruction from experienced musicians to students of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels. Scholarships are available. A multitude of music education […]]]>


The North Valley School of Music begins the 2022-2023 program year with a fall schedule full of diverse and inclusive music programs and invites the community to register. The nonprofit music school combines high-quality instruction from experienced musicians to students of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels. Scholarships are available.

A multitude of music education options are available, including:

• Music Together – Early Childhood Group Experience for 0-5 year olds with a caregiver

• Glee Club — Free children’s choir for ages 7 to 12

• Music Tech Camp – Digital Music Creation for Grades 5-8

• Bucket Drumming – Fun drumming sessions for grades 4-8

• Bluegrass Fiddle and Acoustic Jams: free jams on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings

• Learn to play guitar and ukulele lessons — Group lessons for veterans and adults

• Plus, private lessons in piano, violin, viola, cello, bass, percussion, voice, guitar (acoustic and electric), mandolin, banjo, violin, harp, saxophone and more. Begining Suzuki Instruction is also available on piano.

“Ultimately, we want to bring music into people’s daily lives,” said Jessica Shaw, Opportunity Director at NVMS. “Whether you prefer in-person or virtual classes, group learning or one-on-one instruction, NVMS has a place for you.”

Registration tools and more details on class times and fees can be found at northvalleymusicschool.org or by calling 406-862-8074. The scholarships are made possible by donations and donations made through the Great Fish Community Challenge hosted by the Whitefish Community Foundation, which runs until September 14.


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