Music instruments – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 12:14:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music instruments – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 Software maker Faded Instruments doubles down on its Faded Toolbox https://giuliavalle.com/software-maker-faded-instruments-doubles-down-on-its-faded-toolbox/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 16:59:22 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/software-maker-faded-instruments-doubles-down-on-its-faded-toolbox/ [ad_1] While some hardware companies are struggling to deliver the goods during the global shortage of electronic parts, it seems not everyone is so biased. Popular plug-in makers Faded Instruments – makers of Litbit, Hormonal Binaurics, Spectral Disturbtion and Blumen And Pflanzen plug-ins, among many others, have just announced their first foray into physical hardware […]]]>

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While some hardware companies are struggling to deliver the goods during the global shortage of electronic parts, it seems not everyone is so biased.

Popular plug-in makers Faded Instruments – makers of Litbit, Hormonal Binaurics, Spectral Disturbtion and Blumen And Pflanzen plug-ins, among many others, have just announced their first foray into physical hardware – the Faded Toolbox hardware line. .

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6 creative instruments made from or in nature https://giuliavalle.com/6-creative-instruments-made-from-or-in-nature/ Wed, 04 May 2022 15:18:13 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/6-creative-instruments-made-from-or-in-nature/ [ad_1] From coconuts to eucalyptus to rams horns, people can make music out of anything. Keep reading to learn how Mother Nature makes music. by PATRICK MCGUIRE from SoundFly. You are no doubt familiar with the concept of songwriters and songwriters using nature as inspiration for their work, whether by Justin Vernon now very famous […]]]>

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From coconuts to eucalyptus to rams horns, people can make music out of anything. Keep reading to learn how Mother Nature makes music.

by PATRICK MCGUIRE from SoundFly.

You are no doubt familiar with the concept of songwriters and songwriters using nature as inspiration for their work, whether by Justin Vernon now very famous winter trip to his family’s little cabin in rural Wisconsin, or by Gustav Holst masterpiece “The Planets”, or by Erik Ian Walker music for climate change.

But what you might not know is that human beings have made some pretty incredible musical instruments made from nature itself, using everything from physical materials to natural events such as waves. .

Now, of course, most instruments are made from natural materials, like wood, ivory, and animal skins or hair, but these six beautiful, creative, nature-constructed instruments will give you an appreciation you perhaps never thought possible for the role of the environment. in musical creation throughout history.

The Shofar

Let’s start with one of the oldest instruments in the history of mankind. These ancient instruments are usually made from rams horns and are used in Jewish religious ceremonies. Since the Shofar obviously lacks the valves and pads typically found in brass and woodwind instruments, players control the pitch exclusively via mouth, or by manipulating the lips, facial muscles, tongue and teeth. Some shofars are painted or feature ornate carvings, while others have a more natural look (like the one in the video above).

Ice instruments

Ice is not a material with which the vast majority of human beings are able to create. However, the ice sculptor Tim Linhart is not like most human beings. According to Linhart, he built his first musical instrument out of ice in the late 90s and had a vision to create a concert using similar instruments exclusively. In 2017, he achieves this by using string and melodic percussion instruments all made from ice, with a temperature and humidity controlled room he designed himself to play them.

The coconut

A hollowed-out coconut can also serve as the body of a stringed instrument, as can many resonant objects found in nature such as gourds and even hardened spider egg sacs. Everything about this instrument is beautiful, from the slow and painstaking process it took to create it, to the sound and appearance of the instrument. You can’t really claim this single-stringed instrument is versatile, but it’s beautiful and comes straight from the bounty of Mother Nature herself.

+ Learn more about Flypaper: “4 huge instruments that take music to new levels.”

Hydraulophone

These fascinating instruments are played by direct contact with water. If you have a few minutes to kill, it’s worth checking out the various iterations of this quirky and delightful instrument, which features everything from spinning discs to intricate valve assemblies. Not only are hydraulophones intriguing, but they also serve as sensory exploration devices for the visually impaired.

The glass harmonica (invented in 1761) is a similar instrument, which uses wet fingers coming into contact with rotating glass discs to produce a wide range of tones and timbres.

Didgeridoo

Another ancient instrument on this list, the didgeridoo, is believed to have originated thousands of years ago, and its connections to the natural world include not only the material from which it is made, but also its process of construction. Traditional didgeridoos, which are usually made from hardwoods, are not even built by man but are found in nature. Trees dug by termites are harvested before being adapted into instruments, and this process requires special knowledge of the landscape and the behavior of termites; owned by indigenous communities.

Zadar sea organ

Housed in Zadar, Croatia, this sea organ – originally built by two architects in the “old town” – is a fascinating experimental musical instrument that taps into the natural force of ocean waves to generate sound. Created during an effort to rebuild the city’s shoreline after World War II, the “architectural sound art object” consists of a network of polyethylene tubing and a resonant cavity located under wooden steps. marble that lead to the sea. The music produced by the Sea Organ in Zadar is random but harmonious, with a somewhat distorted but deep and beautiful sound.

From instruments carved out of ice to a massive organ powered by the waves, it’s fascinating to see how humans have been able to turn nature into music.

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Guitar surgeon gives old instruments their voices back https://giuliavalle.com/guitar-surgeon-gives-old-instruments-their-voices-back/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 18:06:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/guitar-surgeon-gives-old-instruments-their-voices-back/ [ad_1] Walk through the front door of Bob Smakula’s studio and — it’s a lot to take in. Every flat surface is covered with clutter: scissors, screwdrivers, paintbrushes, fork, bottle of lighter fluid. An entire wall is just wooden clamps of various sizes and denominations. But eventually you see past the clutter and begin to […]]]>

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Walk through the front door of Bob Smakula’s studio and — it’s a lot to take in.

Every flat surface is covered with clutter: scissors, screwdrivers, paintbrushes, fork, bottle of lighter fluid. An entire wall is just wooden clamps of various sizes and denominations.

But eventually you see past the clutter and begin to notice all the musical instruments, in various states of repair.

There’s a ukulele on Smakula’s workbench. It’s a 1920s Martin; a beautiful instrument and a real collector’s item, but it has problems.

“For some reason Martin used mahogany for the tuning pegs, so they’re tough. Very tough,” he said.

These mechanics are held in place by friction, like those of a violin. This friction caused one of those brittle mahogany posts to break.

“I will replace them with a comparable ebony peg. And it will work better for him. He’s going to be able to tune things up a bit better,” Smakula said.

This is Smakula’s style. He could have slapped a set of modern metal gear tuners on that uke. It would have remained perfectly tuned. But that wouldn’t be fair for a 100-year-old instrument like this.

Smakula tries to make repairs that fix an instrument’s problems while staying true to its story.

“I definitely honed my skills to try to be invisible,” he said. “I don’t want anyone to know that I’ve ever been there except to say ‘Hey, that’s playing better than usual’ or ‘That sounds better than usual’.”

Smakula has been honing her powers of invisibility for a long time. He hails from Cleveland, Ohio, where his parents were involved in the folk music scene of the 1960s and 1970s.

At that time, new acoustic instruments were overbuilt and heavy. Folk musicians tended to seek out older instruments, but these often needed repair. So Smakula’s father, Peter, an engineer by trade, started fixing them.

Smakula was also interested in the inner workings of musical instruments. He learned to play the dulcimer on his mother’s lap and wanted one of his own. He didn’t have the money, so he sent for a build-your-own dulcimer kit.

“My parents’ friends saw the instrument and said, ‘Hey, you made it. Could you make me one? The next thing I knew was that I I was 14 and doing business making dulcimers for people,” he said.

Father and son eventually joined forces and opened the Goose Acres Folk Music Center in Cleveland where they bought, sold, built and repaired folk instruments.

Instrument repair was a difficult trade to learn in those days.

“We were definitely inventing the wheel,” he said. “The information age of instrument work simply did not exist. There were a few books out there, so I took whatever I could from the printed sources. But it’s not like now, where you can find everything you want to know via the Internet.

Smakula learned much of what he knows from the instruments that appeared on his operating table.

“Maybe a part needed to be replaced. We would investigate that and put something similar in place. Every manufacturer has their own little quirks or their own little design style,” he said.

His work developed such a reputation that Smakula decided to leave Cleveland – and the business he had started with his father. He followed his new wife Mary, who worked for the U.S. Forest Service in Elkins, and moved his operations to West Virginia.

“I decided that I could do my job anywhere in the world. It didn’t have to be in Cleveland,” he said. “Anywhere a UPS truck can come, I can fix an instrument and ship it back to the owner.”

He was right. In addition to his repair work, Smakula also taught instrument repair classes at the nearby Augusta Heritage Center. That’s how he found his apprentices Nate Druckenmiller and Andy Fitzgibbon.

Now customers from all over the country ship their banjos, mandolins, fiddles and guitars to this little store in the woods so Smakula and his team can get them singing again.

Like a particular banjo from 1887.

“[It was] made by a talented cabinet maker who, maybe banjos weren’t his main thing. But it’s really interesting,” Smakula said.

On a recent Monday morning, the instrument was resting on Fitzgibbon’s workbench. He has worked for Smakula for over 20 years and is the go-to banjo in the store.

“You see a lot of unique, one-of-a-kind homes like this. [They] vary in quality from really raw to really nice. And this one is really nice,” Fitzgibbon said. “It’s good to get them running again.”

But as enjoyable as it is, there are some things about this old banjo that just don’t live up to modern standards.

Builders today know that frets must be placed with precision, down to hundredths of an inch, for an instrument to play in tune. The frets on this 1887 banjo weren’t placed as precisely.

“At this point you have to balance the playability with the historical aspect,” Fitzgibbon said.

Since this instrument is more of a collector’s item, Fitzgibbon decides to keep the wonky fret work. But the balance could tip the other way if the instrument was to be played on stage or if the original construction compromised the structural integrity of the banjo.

In these cases, Fitzgibbon would apply a bit more modern craftsmanship. That’s what happened with Smakula’s own 1903 Fairbanks banjo.

It’s a family heirloom. His uncle found him in a bar in Newton Center, Massachusetts.

“He walks in one day and sees this banjo in the corner,” Smakula said. “He goes ‘Hey Tom, what’s with the banjo?’ And Tom is like, ‘Hey, somebody used it to pay a bar bill. You want it? You can have it.'”

He had a lot of sentimental value, but he wasn’t a great player.

“All the time I’ve had it, I always thought there was something missing. There’s something that needs to be done to make it the best banjo for me,” he said.

The fingerboard was blackened hardwood. It’s a technique where woodworkers mimic the look of ebony by creating a chemical reaction with the wood’s natural acids.

“The acidic matrices they used 120 years ago slowly degrade the cellular structure of wood,” Smakula said. “Without it being a good solid piece of wood, it would bend very slightly and make it harder to play.”

After years of working on instruments like this, Smakula and Fitzgibbon decided to rip out the old fingerboard and replace it with real ebony. They replaced the dowel head wood with a special type of poplar that matches the color of the old blackened wood but is more stable.

“And that banjo went from my favorite family heirloom to my favorite banjo to play,” Smakula said.

Smakula had been playing this banjo for almost 40 years before doing this repair. Why the delay? Well, the instrument really belonged to his father. It didn’t come into Smakula’s possession until after Peter’s death in 2008. But it worked perfectly. By the time it was truly his, Smakula had the years of experience to know exactly how to fix it.

Smakula doesn’t make its customers wait that long for their repairs. Some only take a few hours. A severe case can take six months. All you have to do is find a spot on their endless waiting list.

That’s why, as I was saying goodbye, Smakula made a request.

“When you broadcast this, I want to make sure you don’t leak my exact location,” he said. “Say ‘North of Elkins.'”

I said I noticed he only had a PO box on his website. Was he afraid someone would break in and run away with someone’s vintage guitar? No.

It turns out that Smakula is worried about something even more valuable.

“You see how busy we are,” he said. “If I had my address, people would pass. “Oh, I just wanted to see what you have.” I do not have time.”

It turns out he has more than one reason to be invisible.

This story is part of Appalachian Folkways Report Project, made possible in part through support from Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies at the West Virginia Public Broadcasting Foundation. To subscribe to Inside Appalachia to hear more stories about Appalachian folk life, arts and culture.

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Did the stars of Netflix’s Metal Lords actually play their instruments? https://giuliavalle.com/did-the-stars-of-netflixs-metal-lords-actually-play-their-instruments/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 21:52:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/did-the-stars-of-netflixs-metal-lords-actually-play-their-instruments/ [ad_1] Despite their convincing performances, the three main actors of “Metal Lords” had no experience in metal rock before working on the film. In fact, neither Jaeden Martell nor Isis Hainsworth had played an instrument of any kind; Adrian Greensmith, on the other hand, is a jazz guitarist and an exception to the group (via […]]]>

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Despite their convincing performances, the three main actors of “Metal Lords” had no experience in metal rock before working on the film. In fact, neither Jaeden Martell nor Isis Hainsworth had played an instrument of any kind; Adrian Greensmith, on the other hand, is a jazz guitarist and an exception to the group (via Tudum). Luckily for the actors, they had a pretty genuine coach – Tom Morello, the guitarist of the metal band Rage Against the Machine, acted as their chief metal adviser (in the words of writer DB Weiss). Additionally, Hainsworth trained with a professional cellist named Vanessa Freebairn-Smith.

Speaking to Tudum about the process of coaching young actors, Morello said, “Because they weren’t metalheads…it was very important for them to play the music right. They really made a great job as actors learning how to do it looks exactly like they are playing the [songs]. Morello, however, insisted that the work had to go beyond learning the moves. He continued, “You have to be inhabited by the holy spirit of heavy metal.”

To help actors find that spirit, he created a mood board for actors, featuring photos such as Metallica singer James Hetfield screaming while performing. Morello also told Martell how hard he had to hit the drums while he played (in layman’s terms: unbelievably hard). In the end, Morello was content with the finished project: “[They] managed to trick me, which I thought was pretty good.”

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Native Instruments launches a new Kontakt instrument, PLAYBOX https://giuliavalle.com/native-instruments-launches-a-new-kontakt-instrument-playbox/ Thu, 24 Mar 2022 23:51:39 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/native-instruments-launches-a-new-kontakt-instrument-playbox/ [ad_1] Native Instruments launches a new Kontakt instrument, PLAYBOX Native Instruments music production software, MASCHINE hardware, DJ Traktor gear, and KOMPLETE instruments and effects belong to the highest tier of the music scene. Besides their most recent instruments; Prime Bass, Lunar Echoes and Stradivari Cello, they announced the 4th addition to their line of instruments. […]]]>

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Native Instruments launches a new Kontakt instrument, PLAYBOX

Native Instruments music production software, MASCHINE hardware, DJ Traktor gear, and KOMPLETE instruments and effects belong to the highest tier of the music scene. Besides their most recent instruments; Prime Bass, Lunar Echoes and Stradivari Cello, they announced the 4th addition to their line of instruments. On March 23, 2022, NI released its new randomization instrument called PLAYBOX.

| The Essential: Plugins & Gear Used by 70+ Artists – Click Here to Checkout

PLAYBOX is NI’s latest software instrument addition, this time focusing on randomization. Whether you are a beginner musician or a professional engineer, this plugin remains a challenge for everyone. Through a combination of chord generation, sample layering, effects, and randomization, you’ll discover an unexplored world of creative possibilities. As a solution to the famous writer’s block, NI mainly focuses on refreshing your workflow and stimulating your creativity. Access over 200 chord sets, over 900 samples, and over 200 effect presets, playable at the click of a button.

The main interface of PLAYBOX can be divided into 4 sections: chords, samples, effects and the main control panel. By putting together the right notes, you can create unique chord combinations yourself in the Chords section. A total of 905 alluring samples can be chosen specifically or by rolling the dice in the Samples section. Chord and sample combinations can be colored and shaped through multiple LFOs, envelopes, filters and different types of effects such as delay, reverb and a limiter. On the main control panel, you will be able to merge individual samples, such as vocals or synths, into a chord and control up to 8 different chords with just one finger. Record your own chords, import MIDI files, or choose from the 224 included chord sets. Using the built-in effects strip, you can quickly modify your sound with distortion (bit crush), shaper, strum, verb, strum octave, drive and strip. Use the XY pad to switch between effects and embrace happy accidents using the randomize dice button.

Nadine Raihani, UX & Market Research Manager at NI and co-creator of PLAYBOX, on the plugin: “Our goal as creators was to establish a sound library that doesn’t just focus on one specific sound, but rather explores the full range of sounds available to us and embraces the happy accidents you encounter when working with it. randomization”,

PLAYBOX is offered at the standard price of 199 €. Currently, there is a special 25% discount until April 24, which is on sale at the price of 149 €.

Buy here

Take a look at the PLAYBOX presentation video below:

Next post: We Rave You Tech launches Vol. 2 pack of melodic house and techno samples

Image credits: Native Instruments

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