Music instruments – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 10:14:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://giuliavalle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Music instruments – Giulia Valle http://giuliavalle.com/ 32 32 American Idol winner visits Pendleton Elementary, donates instruments | New https://giuliavalle.com/american-idol-winner-visits-pendleton-elementary-donates-instruments-new/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 00:08:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/american-idol-winner-visits-pendleton-elementary-donates-instruments-new/ Laine Hardy pictured with students at Pendleton Elementary School PENDLETON, South Carolina (FOX Caroline) – American Idol Season 17 winner Laine Hardy surprised Pendleton Elementary with new instruments for their music program. The singer performed and answered questions in hopes of eliciting musical inspiration. The principal says this is the school’s first assembly since January […]]]>






Laine Hardy pictured with students at Pendleton Elementary School


PENDLETON, South Carolina (FOX Caroline) – American Idol Season 17 winner Laine Hardy surprised Pendleton Elementary with new instruments for their music program.

The singer performed and answered questions in hopes of eliciting musical inspiration.

The principal says this is the school’s first assembly since January 2020 due to the pandemic.

Hardy’s message was to remind students to never give up.

“I hope the kids will be inspired to pick up an instrument and maybe learn something,” Hardy said.

Student Maggie-Claire Williams was excited.

“I really liked it because I’m country. And I love country music,” Williams said.

Many schools across the country are struggling to fund their music programs. Hardy says he wanted to do his part at Pendleton Elementary.

“When I was in high school we didn’t have a great music education program,” Hardy said, “but I just want to reinforce them whenever I can, give back.”

He collaborated with Wild Wing Cafe and Little Kids Rock to donate keyboards, pianos and more.

Fourth grader Anna Blaire Ladd can’t wait to play them all.

“I play basic,” Ladd said, “I play piano, ukulele, that’s about it.”

Sixth-grader Harper Allen says she’s grateful that they’ll also have a Hardy piece to hang on to.

“I think it’s really cool that he donated it,” Allen said, “Especially when he signed the guitar.”

Williams got Hardy’s message to never give up. The singer was knocked out the first time he auditioned for American Idol. He came back and won it all. However, there may be competition.

“He said, ‘never give up.’ And that means a lot, “Williams said,” I want to be a country music singer. And I want to be a softball player too. ”

Hardy performs at the Wild Wing Cafe in Anderson on Saturday.

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Musicopia repairs and donates instruments to teachers in Philly https://giuliavalle.com/musicopia-repairs-and-donates-instruments-to-teachers-in-philly/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 11:15:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/musicopia-repairs-and-donates-instruments-to-teachers-in-philly/ Anderson’s Connection is Musicopia, a music education organization that provides in-class and after-school music training to school children in Philadelphia. It also receives donations of musical instruments, repairs them and distributes them to schools. Over the past 10 years, Musicopia has donated around 5,800 instruments to schools, to put them in the hands of children. […]]]>

Anderson’s Connection is Musicopia, a music education organization that provides in-class and after-school music training to school children in Philadelphia. It also receives donations of musical instruments, repairs them and distributes them to schools. Over the past 10 years, Musicopia has donated around 5,800 instruments to schools, to put them in the hands of children.

In a pre-pandemic period, the organization would provide instruments directly to schools in need. But for the past year, staff have not been allowed to enter schools due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Ken Eidinger, Head of Instrument Donation for Musicopia, inspects a trombone with Musicopia Executive Director Catherine Charlton. (Emma Lee / WHYY)

Musicopia Executive Director Catherine Charlton said she started these Giving Days in January 2021, Martin Luther King Day, as a Day of Service action. Since then, she has made four more, the most recent of which was on November 30, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving.

“We are offering instruments as an act of service for Giving Tuesday,” Charlton said.

Most of the thousands of instruments that Musicopia has received over the years have come one by one, from people who no longer need them.

“Maybe their children have grown up. They don’t use them. They are retired musicians who no longer use the instruments. These are the people who clean their family homes and find instruments, ”Charlton said. “What is beautiful is that all these instruments have stories. The instruments are so special to the people who played, held and created them through these instruments. Being able to give them a new life is simply extremely rewarding.

Charlton would like to retrace the stories of each instrument. To this end, Musicopia is developing a new database system for all the instruments it donates: each instrument receives an identification barcode so that it can be tracked throughout the repair and donation process. The system is set up to collect information so that one day Musicopia can relate the story of the instrument’s life with the previous owner, to its new life in the hands of a young student.

“In some situations, we know the stories. We had a family recently, their mother had been with the Delaware Symphony for over 30 years and was a teacher in the Philadelphia School District: the Loder family, ”said Charlton. “They donated their mother’s violin and viola, which we were able to give to the students who were going to the conservatory. A young man is now at the Peabody Institute with Dory Loder’s violin.


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Instruments of Friendship – Chinadaily.com.cn https://giuliavalle.com/instruments-of-friendship-chinadaily-com-cn/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 01:00:19 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/instruments-of-friendship-chinadaily-com-cn/ Pipa player and composer Wu Man (center) and other artists from the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in New York City perform on Sunday at a concert celebrating traditional and modern Chinese classical music at the center. [Photo/Xinhua] Chamber musicians from China and the United States gather at Lincoln Center to perform classical pieces […]]]>

Pipa player and composer Wu Man (center) and other artists from the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in New York City perform on Sunday at a concert celebrating traditional and modern Chinese classical music at the center. [Photo/Xinhua]

Chamber musicians from China and the United States gather at Lincoln Center to perform classical pieces that bridge the East-West divide, Minlu Zhang reports in New York.

A concert featuring traditional and modern Chinese classical music on Sunday helped provide a much needed celebration of the arts and people-to-people exchange.

The concert at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts drew nearly 1,000 music fans.

David Shifrin, a clarinetist who has performed with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for more than 40 years, says he is delighted to perform there for the first time since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Music plays a huge role in all countries. We don’t think of politics; we don’t think of disease. We just think of expressing ourselves and working with each other in music,” Shifrin said. .

Under the theme “Chinese Inspirations”, the concert presented six pieces by Chinese composers derived from traditional Chinese music, classical literature and other elements.

Eight Chinese artists and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center performed together.

Shifrin notes that there are many similarities in language and the points of reference between Eastern and Western music. “It’s really fascinating to hear the music of half a dozen different Chinese composers who have been influenced by both East and West, and translate it on Western instruments,” he says. .

“The songs I play all use western instruments, but the way the string instruments are tuned sounds so different. I thought sometimes it sounded more like Chinese stringed instruments than the western violin,” Shifrin says. , who played clarinet in Tales From the Nine Bells and Mandalas in the Rubble.


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Colorado Symphony asks spectators to donate instruments https://giuliavalle.com/colorado-symphony-asks-spectators-to-donate-instruments/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 16:31:10 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/colorado-symphony-asks-spectators-to-donate-instruments/ Orchestra’s partnership with Bringing Music to Life will benefit underfunded school music programs across Colorado By Steve Blatt Starting December 3, Colorado Symphony musicians won’t be the only ones carrying instruments into the Boettcher Concert Hall. The orchestra is asking members of the public to donate used instruments they no longer play to the non-profit […]]]>

Orchestra’s partnership with Bringing Music to Life will benefit underfunded school music programs across Colorado

By Steve Blatt

Starting December 3, Colorado Symphony musicians won’t be the only ones carrying instruments into the Boettcher Concert Hall. The orchestra is asking members of the public to donate used instruments they no longer play to the non-profit Bringing Music to Life Instrument Drive. Bring Music to Life will be in the lobby on 10 concert dates in December and January to receive donated instruments. Instruments will be repaired and awarded to deserving music programs throughout Colorado before the start of the next school year.

Symphony audience members can donate instruments to Colorado Symphony concerts on December 3, 4, 5, 10, 11 and 12; and January 21, 22 and 23.

“Over the past few years,” said Steve Blatt, executive director of Bringing Music to Life, “we only organized our instrument transmissions in March. But thanks to our continued partnership with the Colorado Symphony, we’ll start early.

The Symphony’s collaboration with Bringing Music to Life began in 2019 and continues this year.

Principal flautist Brook Ferguson (pictured above) will appear in a video for the nonprofit starting in December.

“Brook’s life was drastically changed by a donated instrument she received as a teenager,” Blatt noted. “We couldn’t ask for a better partner. ”

Spectators can drop off their instrument donations before 10 Colorado Symphony concerts in December and January. “Come a few minutes early and bring your instrument to our table in the lobby,” said Blatt. “In just a few minutes, you will have enabled us to offer music to a deserving child in Colorado.

Over eleven annual instrument campaigns, Bringing Music to Life has awarded more than 6,500 musical instruments worth $ 2.5 million to schools in Colorado. You can find more information about Bringing Music to Life at www.bringmusic.org.

Steve Blatt is Executive Director of Bringing Music to Life.


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Petworth Town Band: how to join and what instruments they play https://giuliavalle.com/petworth-town-band-how-to-join-and-what-instruments-they-play/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 12:02:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/petworth-town-band-how-to-join-and-what-instruments-they-play/ It is one of the few traditional groups in the city of West Sussex. For many years the group has performed under the direction of conductor Martyn Streeter and music director Paula Streeter. Martyn Streeter said: “We welcome any musical instrumentalist and currently the band includes brass, cornets, trumpets, horns, euphoniums, trombones and tubas as […]]]>

It is one of the few traditional groups in the city of West Sussex.

For many years the group has performed under the direction of conductor Martyn Streeter and music director Paula Streeter.

Martyn Streeter said: “We welcome any musical instrumentalist and currently the band includes brass, cornets, trumpets, horns, euphoniums, trombones and tubas as well as saxophones, clarinets, flutes and of course. percussion. “

Music from the town of Petworth

The group currently has 30 members. There is no age limit, but over the years the starting age has become younger, many starting around ten, with its oldest members in the 70s.

Read more

Read more

Petworth Community Garden just got stronger and stronger

Martyn said: “Members come from all over, but we are firmly rooted in the community of Petworth and are proud to lead the annual Remembrance Sunday Parade and participate in other local events.

“In addition to our two annual concerts, we also perform at parties, Cowdray Gold Cup Polo, private parties and corporate events.”

The band provides all music, uniform, tuition, and membership completely free to members.

He can also provide brass instruments on loan for free, all they ask in return is that the members regularly attend rehearsals and engagements that take place throughout the year.

He said: “We have a popular and diverse repertoire of traditional music and marches, film and television themes, old favorites and modern melodies.

“We are a friendly and inclusive bunch and welcome new brass, woodwind and percussion players of all ages and abilities.

“Our chairman, Lord Egremont, in conjunction with the National Trust, is providing the group with a room above the stables at Petworth House, adjacent to Church Lodge, Petworth, where we practice every Monday evening from 7 to 8:30 p.m.”

The group expects everyone who joins the group to be at the 3rd grade level, but Martyn said if enough people were interested they would be willing to run classes to teach people from scratch without previous experience.

“The members of the Petworth Town Band are such a welcoming and helpful bunch of people and no matter what your level is you can experience great satisfaction and pleasure from performing to the best of your ability,” said Michelle, who plays the Petworth Town Band. Euphonium.

Petworth Town Band can also be booked for a variety of engagements.


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Xuron Corp. Introduces TK 3400-Musicians Tool Kit for Stringed Instruments and Electronics | New https://giuliavalle.com/xuron-corp-introduces-tk-3400-musicians-tool-kit-for-stringed-instruments-and-electronics-new/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 13:17:23 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/xuron-corp-introduces-tk-3400-musicians-tool-kit-for-stringed-instruments-and-electronics-new/ CESO, Maine, November 30, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Xuron Corp. introduced a handy tool kit which has been specially developed for musicians and which includes separate wire cutters for hard and soft wires and a long nose pliers. Xuron’s TK 3400-Musicians Tool Kit includes three tools: Model 2193 Hardwire Snips for musical wire up […]]]>

CESO, Maine, November 30, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Xuron Corp. introduced a handy tool kit which has been specially developed for musicians and which includes separate wire cutters for hard and soft wires and a long nose pliers.

Xuron’s TK 3400-Musicians Tool Kit includes three tools: Model 2193 Hardwire Snips for musical wire up to 0.040 “in diameter, Model 2175 Maxi-Shear ™ Flush Cutter for soft wire up to. 12 AWG (2 mm) and the model 485 long nose pliers to locate and hold. These three versatile tools are well suited for virtually all types of stringed instruments and for use with lead wires.

Comfortable to hold in both hands, each of the ergonomic hand tools in the Xuron TK 3400-Musicians Tool Kit is made from a tough alloy steel and has a non-glare black finish that is easy on the eyes and helps to make the wires more visible. For ease of use, they all feature Xuro-Rubber ™ padded handles and a Light-Touch ™ return spring.

Xuron’s TK 3400-Musicians Tool Kit is priced at $ 63.50(listing). Literature is available on request.

For more information, contact:

Xuron Company

Abby robey, Marketing

62, industrial park road

Saco, me 04072-1840

(207) 283-1401 FAX (207) 283-0594

e-mail: arobey@xuron.com

http://www.xuron.com

Media contact

Abby robey, Xuron Corporation, (207) 283-1401, arobey@xuron.com

SOURCE Xuron Corporation


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Violinist in Peru makes instruments from recycled waste so kids can play https://giuliavalle.com/violinist-in-peru-makes-instruments-from-recycled-waste-so-kids-can-play/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 17:09:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/violinist-in-peru-makes-instruments-from-recycled-waste-so-kids-can-play/ 29 November 2021, 17:09 Jesús Peralta makes violins from recycled materials. Image: Getty This professional violinist and music teacher shares his love of music with the children of Lima, Peru, creating cheaper violins made from recycled materials. Jesús Peralta is a music teacher who makes violins from plastic bottles, corks and plywood in his hometown […]]]>

29 November 2021, 17:09

Jesús Peralta makes violins from recycled materials.

Image: Getty


This professional violinist and music teacher shares his love of music with the children of Lima, Peru, creating cheaper violins made from recycled materials.

Jesús Peralta is a music teacher who makes violins from plastic bottles, corks and plywood in his hometown of Lima, Peru.

The 68-year-old professional violinist turned carpenter says that with the rising price of instruments, the only way to get instruments into the hands of future musicians is to build them himself.

In her home workshop, Peralta can build her ‘bottle violin’ for just £ 15 on average. Buying a real the violin in Peru would cost much more for a beginner instrument.

Peralta’s decades-long career has seen him perform with artists like Luciano Pavarotti, and has been directed by Claudio Abbado and Gustavo Dudamel.

Read more: Small 4-inch violin leaves Spain’s Got Talent viewers mesmerized

In 2012, Peralta founded Los Violines De San Juan, which offers free group violin lessons to young students of one of the Pueblos Jóvenes (meaning young towns), San Juan de Miraflores.

About 6.9 million Peruvians live below Peru’s poverty line, and San Juan de Miraflores is one of the most disadvantaged neighborhoods in the country’s capital. The city is said to be one of the most dangerous in Lima.

A 2018 report from TECHO – a non-profit organization fighting extreme poverty in Latin America – found that nine out of ten homes in San Juan de Miraflores had no secure access to the public water supply network, nor connection to the drainage network.

At the time of publication of the report, TECHO-Peru social director Jonathan Rossi said: “The lack of solutions to the basic needs of a resident of the San Juan de Miraflores neighborhood is a clear state of alert, a violation Rights. and proof of the lack of a good quality of life for Peruvians.

Read more: 12,000 Venezuelan musicians perform Tchaikovsky to set the record for “the largest orchestra in the world”

Peralta in her home workshop

Peralta in her home workshop.

Image: Getty


Many students who attend Los Violines De San Juan travel for miles to attend their Sunday group lesson with Peralta.

Showcasing his new invention of the Bottlephone violin, Peralta said in a video on Facebook: “When you love music, there shouldn’t be any obstacle preventing you from playing it. “

And that’s exactly why Peralta created the cheaper violin, so that they can continue to share their love of music with the next generation, regardless of financial barriers.

A review on Los Violines De San Juan The Facebook page describes the musician as “a hero without a cape,” and we’re going to have to agree with them. Well done, Jesús Peralta, we look forward to seeing your legacy continue through the performance of your students.

Gracias Padre Celestial, por el “Reencuentro con mis chicos de LOS VIOLINES DE SAN JUAN”. Gracias TELE MUNDO Gracias FRECUENCIA LATINA Gracias Chicos y Padres de Familia, Todos juntos, con nuestros seguidores y con el público in general, llegaremos a más niños y jóvenes en todo el Perú, con el apoyo del INPE a laces de ProductANDARES Cár association , forjadores de la Educación y la Cultura by Carlos Levano Sarmiento.

posted by Jesús Peralta Chunga on Saturday, October 9, 2021



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Covid Scotland: Recruiting new children to learn musical instruments ‘impossible’ during pandemic https://giuliavalle.com/covid-scotland-recruiting-new-children-to-learn-musical-instruments-impossible-during-pandemic/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 16:42:38 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/covid-scotland-recruiting-new-children-to-learn-musical-instruments-impossible-during-pandemic/ The number of children taking an instrument course fell 14,604 – 26% – from the previous year to 41,594 in the 2020/2021 school year, a report from the Department of Education found. improvement of local government. In the report, the councils said recruiting new students was “difficult or impossible”, with the entry of instructors into […]]]>

The number of children taking an instrument course fell 14,604 – 26% – from the previous year to 41,594 in the 2020/2021 school year, a report from the Department of Education found. improvement of local government.

In the report, the councils said recruiting new students was “difficult or impossible”, with the entry of instructors into primary schools severely restricted and the opportunities for new students to try the instruments “severely limited”. In some local communities – such as East Lothian, which hired through the council’s YouTube channel – re-hiring was possible, but took place online.

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In addition to limited recruitment, local authorities have also reported higher rates of students dropping out of the service and lower levels of engagement in musical instrument lessons. In Inverclyde, nearly 400 learners withdrew from the service in 2020/21, or nearly a third of the workforce in this municipality.

Fewer children have had the opportunity to learn an instrument in Scottish schools due to Covid.

Some local authorities highlighted the limitations of recruiting in some aerosol-producing instruments such as brass, woodwinds and vocals, while other councils also said that the number of learners was limited by the lack of courses available in because of the difficulties in organizing larger group classes online rather than in person.

The report states: “A number of reasons appear to have contributed to students’ disengagement from services, including the shift to online learning, which some students seem to have struggled with; an absence of live play and group activities such as concerts, bands and orchestras; and more generally the impact the pandemic has had on the mental health of young people, with increased levels of stress and anxiety reported. “

At the level of each local authority, the proportion of pupils participating in instrumental music lessons varied considerably, ranging from 2% to 24% of all primary education and

high school students. In just two local authorities, Dundee City and the Orkney Islands, the proportion of students attending instrumental music lessons increased between 2019/20 and 2020/21. On average, however, participation rates fell by two percentage points in all local communities.

Eilean Siar was hit the hardest with a 5.7 percentage point drop in turnout followed by a 4.7 percentage point drop for Argyll and Bute.

Read more

Read more

The complaint of a music activist rejected by the government

In July, the Scottish government announced that fees for children learning a musical instrument at school would be waived thanks to a £ 7million fund. In recent years, more councils have started charging for children’s musical instrument lessons, with just six local authorities – Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Orkney, Renfrewshire and West Dunbartonshire still keeping lessons free before the pandemic. Some other councils have temporarily waived fees during the pandemic.

The duration of instrumental music lessons also varies according to local authorities. On average, most students receive a minimum of 23 minutes of lesson per instrument per week, but lessons range from a minimum of 10 minutes to a maximum of 50 minutes.

The report warned the Scottish government should prepare for a rebound in recruitment of musicians due to the fee waiver.

He said: “As all tuition fees have now been removed, it remains to be seen what the impact will be on student numbers and demand for instrumental music services. Evidence from past years, and even this last year disrupted by Covid, suggests that the number of students is very likely to increase, and it does indeed seem likely that the number of students will rebound strongly to pre-Covid levels. in all cases. This means the Scottish Government will need to ensure that services receive an adequate level of funding to meet any additional demand. “

The report also found that there were fewer music teachers in Scottish schools. The number of full-time equivalent (FTE) instrument teachers employed by local councils increased from 651.9 in 2013/14 to 617.5 in 2020/21.

He added: “What is also clear, however, is that local authorities are already unable to meet demand even when fees are in place. Accordingly, and assuming that one of the objectives of removing fees is to increase participation, consideration will have to be given to the level of funding required not only to meet existing capacity, but also to work to restore capacity. at historic levels.

Ralph Riddiough, who has successfully campaigned for free musical instrument lessons in schools, said: “It is inevitable that there have been no new starts in the last school year and at the other end, many children threw in the towel. Many of them didn’t like to learn online – they like to play in a band or in a group, but to continue online they should be very enthusiastic.

“However, there will probably be a big recruitment drive soon. The Scottish government has made a political commitment to fund free tuition, but if a certain local authority has a huge increase in demand, go to the government. and say it needs more funding, the answer is most likely no.

A Scottish government spokesperson said: ‘Despite the pandemic posing acute challenges for instrumental music lessons, this survey shows that music services have been resilient and innovative to ensure that young people can continue to benefit from high quality experiences. As the restrictions were lifted, we would expect the number of learners to rebound.

‘Since the investigation was undertaken, the Scottish Government and COSLA have come to an agreement to remove the remaining fees for instrumental music tuition fees, thus removing the cost as a factor for young people considering taking music lessons at school. “

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WHS Group Director Pitches New Group Instruments | Local News https://giuliavalle.com/whs-group-director-pitches-new-group-instruments-local-news/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/whs-group-director-pitches-new-group-instruments-local-news/ Washington High School group principal Stewart Alloway asks the Washington school board for new instruments. At last Wednesday’s school board meeting, Alloway told board members that copper equipment currently in use is between 30 and 40 years old, and percussion equipment is around 10 years old. He also said that several of the group’s trumpeters […]]]>

Washington High School group principal Stewart Alloway asks the Washington school board for new instruments.

At last Wednesday’s school board meeting, Alloway told board members that copper equipment currently in use is between 30 and 40 years old, and percussion equipment is around 10 years old. He also said that several of the group’s trumpeters use different brands of trumpets, making it difficult to harmonize their sounds.

Alloway asked the board for all new brass and drum instruments as well as upgrades to sound equipment.

Student and band member Aiden Van Leer demonstrated the band’s need for new instruments by playing one of their current walking baritones and then playing a new one the band hopes to purchase.

Alloway said he received two price estimates on the proposed purchases, one from St. Louis-based Nottelmann Music Co. for $ 252,980 and the other from St. Louis-based Palen Music Center for 272. $ 000. River City Music in Washington was unable to provide an estimate in time for the meeting, he said.

“The retail price would be $ 400,000, but as schools we get a very, very, very, very good discount,” Alloway said.

Alloway said the new instruments are expected to last 30 to 40 years and offered the district to buy silver instruments, which he said are easier to maintain, rather than gold, which the district currently owns. .

Alloway said the marching band’s recall club and high school, through its construction budget, each agreed to pay a third of the cost of the new equipment.

Group staff presented the school board with three options: they can pay for the new instruments without the help of the booster club or the construction budget, they can pay all funds up front and ask the booster club and budget building to pay them back over the next two to five years, or he can pay a third of the cost each year for the next five years while the booster club and construction budget also spends a third each year.

The board of directors reacted positively to the request of Alloway and several of the board members took a moment to congratulate the new band manager on the job.

Board member Dan Leslie said he believes the district should pay for all the instruments, comparing it to the district’s textbook purchases, which the district does without the help of boosters. .

Board member Jason Oesterly asked Alloway what they would do with the old equipment. Alloway said it was too old to be sold to other bands or musicians, but there is a nonprofit in Kansas City that can turn them into art to raise money for charity.

The board then asked Alloway to draft a purchase requisition and return it to the board in January, when it votes on the matter.

“But you have our support,” said Chairman of the Board, John Freitag.

“One hundred percent,” added Susan Thatch, board member.uh.


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PH Bamboo Musical Instruments website launched – Manila Newsletter https://giuliavalle.com/ph-bamboo-musical-instruments-website-launched-manila-newsletter/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 07:56:00 +0000 https://giuliavalle.com/ph-bamboo-musical-instruments-website-launched-manila-newsletter/ Good news for students, bamboo musical instrument makers and bamboo plantation owners! Bamboo Musical Instruments (BMI) website (DOST-FPRDI) The Department of Science and Technology-Institute for Forest Products Research and Development (DOST-FPRDI) has launched the Bamboo Musical Instruments (BMI) website which will serve as a repository of BMI photos and videos, and a list of species […]]]>

Good news for students, bamboo musical instrument makers and bamboo plantation owners!

Bamboo Musical Instruments (BMI) website (DOST-FPRDI)

The Department of Science and Technology-Institute for Forest Products Research and Development (DOST-FPRDI) has launched the Bamboo Musical Instruments (BMI) website which will serve as a repository of BMI photos and videos, and a list of species of bamboo used in the manufacture of BMI.

The virtual launch took place on November 25 as part of DOST’s celebration of National Science and Technology Week (NSTW).

DOST-FPRDI Director Dr Romulo T. Aggangan said the results of the Institute’s BMI innovation research and development program are contained in the website.

Launched in 2019, the program aims to provide solutions to the following issues faced by the IMC industry: durability, bamboo species, changing traditions and timbre / tone quality, poor playability, improper tuning.

“Formerly billed as the ‘poor man’s wood’, bamboo is now recognized as an ideal alternative to wood for its versatility, rapid growth and excellent properties,” Aggangan said, describing wood as another promising alternative to wood. .

He said that in 2019, the FPDRI embarked on a research and development program to improve BMIs in the country.

“Through the application of science, the researchers behind this initiative have developed technologies to help improve the process and speed up BMI production. “

Main features of the website include program overview, Philippine BMI, list of commercial manufacturers and indigenous people who produce or manufacture IMC, bamboo species used, value chain or manufacturer, different processing technologies, BMI processing center and publications such as monograph, coffee table, compendium and teaching module.

Aggangan said the stories of indigenous communities and local artisans who have engaged in the production of IMC can be found at phbmi.com.

The website also presents the processing technologies developed by the FPRDI and the technical services offered by the Institute.

“With the information made available to the public, we hope that local entrepreneurs and start-ups will venture into the production of IMC,” said the head of the FPRDI.

He said they are also encouraging schools to use the website content as additional learning material for K-12 students. “Our program partner, the Center d’ethnomusicologie UP, has prepared teaching modules that are for everyone to use,” he added.

BMI’s website should also benefit BMI makers, music lovers; bamboo plantation owners or suppliers; and the general public.


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