An encore and a fanfare for used orchestral instruments in Ticonderoga

[ad_1]

Barcone’s music store in Kingston, New York, delivered 35 instruments, method manuals, repair supplies and marching band equipment to Ticonderoga High School earlier this month for distribution to area schools. The company is retiring after 120 years of service. Photo provided

A musical instrument donation effort in the Adirondacks dropped off dozens of used musical instruments in Ticonderoga this month. Brass, woodwinds and even stringed instruments were donated to North Country schools as part of the We are instrumental program. It started at Skidmore College just before the pandemic, when 70 instruments were collected and donated to the Ticonderoga Music Program.

Evan Mack, composer and pianist, found out through his eldest son that some of his classmates in Ticonderoga played instruments held together by duct tape or glue, or could not afford to rent musical instruments anymore. recent.

He contacted the local conductors to start training the instruments. The idea included libraries as collection and distribution points. Since then, Mack says the effort has broadened to offer instruments to school orchestral programs across the region. Earlier this month, the program received a major delivery of instruments from Barcone’s Music Shop, a store in Kingston, NY, which is retiring after 120 years of service. Barcone delivered 35 instruments, method manuals, repair supplies and marching band equipment for We are instrumental to distribute to schools in the region.

Instruments repaired and donated by Barcone's Music Shop, Kingston, NY, are unloaded in the parking lot at Ticonderoga High School this month.  Photo provided

Instruments repaired and donated by Barcone’s Music Shop, Kingston, NY, are unloaded in the parking lot at Ticonderoga High School this month. Photo provided

The program began in Ticonderoga and has spread to other districts in Essex County and the Adirondacks. Michael Iturrino is director of music at Ticonderoga High School and president of the Essex County School Music Association.

Known as “Mister I” by his students, he brought them together for music and a celebration in the school parking lot earlier this month. After music from a student quintet, they unload a van full of musical instruments.

He says, yes, a clarinet or a trumpet, it’s just brass, springs, reed and lacquer. But he and Evan Mack agree that these donated battered instruments are also an opportunity or “gateway” for a youngster who might not otherwise have the opportunity to explore music and the performing arts.

[ad_2]
Source link

Comments are closed.